storm.cis.fordham.edu

storm.cis.fordham.edu

Graph: representation and traversal CISC5835, Computer Algorithms CIS, Fordham Univ. Instructor: X. Zhang Acknowledgement The set of slides have use materials from the following resources Slides for textbook by Dr. Y. Chen from Shanghai Jiaotong Univ. Slides from Dr. M. Nicolescu from UNR Slides sets by Dr. K. Wayne from Princeton which in turn have borrowed materials from other resources Outline Graph Definition Graph Representation Path, Cycle, Tree, Connectivity Graph Traversal Algorithms

Breath first search/traversal Depth first search/traversal Minimal Spaning Tree algorithms Dijkstra algorithm: shortest path a Graphs Applications that involve not only a set of items, but also the connections between them Maps Schedules Hypertext Computer networks Circuits Graphs - Background Graphs = a set of nodes (vertices) with edges (links) between them. Notations: G = (V, E) - graph V = set of vertices

E = set of edges (size of V = n) (size of E = m) 1 2 1 2 1 2 3 4 3 4 3 4 Directed graph Undirected graph Acyclic graph Other Types of Graphs

A graph is connected if there is a path between every two vertices 1 2 1 2 3 4 3 4 Connected A bipartite graph is an undirected graph G = (V, E) in which V = V1 + V2 and there are edges only between vertices in V1 and V2 2 1 9 4 3 Not connected

8 6 7 4 Graph Representation Adjacency list representation of G = (V, E) An array of n lists, one for each vertex in V Each list Adj[u] contains all the vertices v such that there is an edge between u and v Adj[u] contains the vertices adjacent to u (in arbitrary order) Can be used for both directed and undirected graphs 1 2 3 5 4 Undirected graph 1 2 5 2

1 5 3 2 4 4 2 5 3 4 1 2 5 / 4 3 / / Properties of Adjacency List Representation Sum of the lengths of all the

1 2 3 4 adjacency lists Directed graph: size of E (m) Directed graph Edge (u, v) appears only once in us list Undirected graph: 2* size of E (2m) u and v appear in each others adjacency 1 2 3 5 4 lists: edge (u, v) appears twice Undirected graph Properties of Adjacency List Representation Memory required (m+n)

3 Preferred when the graph is sparse: m << n2 2 1 Disadvantage 5 4 Undirected graph no quick way to determine whether there is an edge between node u and v 1 2 3 4 Time to determine if (u, v) exists: O(degree(u)) Time to list all vertices adjacent to u: (degree(u)) Directed graph

Graph Representation Adjacency matrix representation of G = (V, E) 1 Assume vertices are numbered 1, 2, n The representation consists of a matrix Anxn aij = 1 if (i, j) belongs to E, if there is edge (i,j) 1 2 3 4 5 0 otherwise 2 3 5 4 Undirected graph 1 0 1 0 0 1 2

1 0 1 1 1 3 0 1 0 1 0 4 0 1 1 0 1 5 1 1

0 1 0 For undirected graphs matrix A is symmetric: aij = aji A = AT Properties of Adjacency Matrix Representation Memory required (n2), independent on the number of edges in G Preferred when The graph is dense: m is close to n2 need to quickly determine if there is an edge between two vertices Time to list all vertices adjacent to u: (n) Time to determine if (u, v) belongs to E:

(1) Weighted Graphs Weighted graphs = graphs for which each edge has an associated weight w(u, v) w: E -> R, weight function Storing the weights of a graph Adjacency list: Store w(u,v) along with vertex v in us adjacency list Adjacency matrix: Store w(u, v) at location (u, v) in the matrix NetworkX: a Python graph library http://networkx.github.io/ Node: any hashable object as a node. Hashable objects include strings, tuples, integers, and more. Arbitrary edge attributes: weights and labels can be associated with an edge. internal data structures: based on an adjacency list

representation and uses Python dictionary. adjacency structure: implemented as a dictionary of dictionaries top-level (outer) dictionary: keyed by nodes to values that are themselves dictionaries keyed by neighboring node to edge attributes associated with that edge. Support: fast addition, deletion, and lookup of nodes and neighbors in large graphs. underlying datastructure is accessed directly by methods Graphs Everywhere Prerequisite graph for CIS undergrad courses Three jugs of capacity 8, 5 and 3 liters, initially filled with 8, 0 and 0 liters respectively. How to pour water between them so that in the end we have 4, 4 and 0 liters in the three jugs? whats this graph representing? Outline Graph Definition Graph Representation Path, Cycle, Tree, Connectivity Graph Traversal Algorithms basis of other algorithms Paths

A Path in an undirected graph G=(V,E) is a sequence of nodes v1,v2,,vk with the property that each consecutive pair vi-1, vi is joined by an edge in E. A path is simple if all nodes in the path are distinct. A cycle is a path v1,v2,,vk where v1=vk, k>2, and the first k-1 nodes are all distinct An undirected graph is connected if for every pair of nodes u and v, there is a path between u and v Trees A undirected graph is a tree if it is connected and does not contain a cycle. Theorem: Let G be an undirected graph on n nodes. Any two of the following imply the third. G is connected G does not contain a cycle

G has n-1 edges Rooted Trees Given a tree T, choose a root node r and orient each edge away from r. Importance: models hierarchy structure Outline Graph Definition Graph Representation Path, Cycle, Tree, Connectivity Graph Traversal Algorithms basis of other algorithms Searching in a Graph Graph searching = systematically follow the edges of the graph to visit all vertices of the graph

Two basic graph searching algorithms: Graph algorithms are typically elaborations of the basic graph-searching algorithms e.g. puzzle solving, maze walking Breadth-first search Depth-first search Difference: the order in which they explore unvisited edges of the graph Breadth-First Search (BFS) Input: A graph G = (V, E) (directed or undirected) A source vertex s from V Goal: Explore the edges of G to discover every vertex reachable from s, taking the ones closest to s first Output:

d[v] = distance (smallest # of edges) from s to v, for all v from V A breadth-first tree rooted at s that contains all reachable vertices Breadth-First Search (cont.) Keeping track of progress: 1 2 3 5 4 When being discovered a vertex becomes gray 1 2 After discovering all its adjacent vertices the node becomes black 5 4 1 2

Initially, all vertices are white Color each vertex in either white, gray or black source Use FIFO queue Q to maintain the set of gray vertices 3 3 5 4 Breadth-First Tree BFS constructs a breadth-first tree Initially contains root (source vertex s) When vertex v is discovered while scanning adjacency list of a vertex u vertex v and edge (u, v) are added source to the tree A vertex is discovered only once it has only one 1 parent u is the predecessor (parent) of v in the breadth-first 5 tree

Breath-first tree contains nodes that are reachable from source node, and all edges from each nodes predecessor to the node 2 3 4 BFS Application BFS constructs a breadth-first tree BFS finds shortest (hop-count) path from src node to all other reachable nodes source E.g., Whats shortest path from 1 to 3? perform BFS using node 1 as source node Node 2 is discovered while exploring 1s 1 2 3 adjacent nodes => pred. of node 2 is node 1 Node 3 is discovered while exploring node 2s 5 adjacent nodes => pred. of node 3 is node 2 so shortest hop count path is: 1, 2, 3 Useful when we want to find minimal steps to reach a state 4 BFS: Implementation Detail G = (V, E) represented using adjacency

lists color[u] color of vertex u in V pred[u] predecessor of u If u = s (root) or node u has not yet been discovered then pred[u] = NIL d[u] distance (hop count) from source s to vertex u Use a FIFO queue Q to maintain set of gray vertices 1 source d=1 pred =1 2 3 d=2 pred =2 5 4 d=1 d=2 pred =1 pred=5 BFS(V, E, s) 1. 2.

for each u in V - {s} r s t u v r w s x t y u do color[u] = WHITE 3. d[u] 4. pred[u] = NIL 5. color[s] = 6.

d[s] 0 7. pred[s] = 8. Q = empty 9. Q ENQUEUE(Q, s) GRAY NIL v r w s x t y u

0 v w Q: s x y BFS(V, E, s) 10. 11. while Q not empty do u DEQUEUE(Q) 12. for each v in Adj[u] 13. do if color[v] = r s

t 0 u Q: s v r w s x t y u 0 v 1 w

x y r s t u WHITE then color[v] = 14. GRAY 15. d[v] d[u] + 1 16. pred[v] = u 17. ENQUEUE(Q, v) 1 0

v 1 w x y Q: w Q: w, r Example r s t u 0 v w Q: s r s

x y t u 1 0 2 2 1 v w Q: t, x, v r s 2 x y t u 1 0 2

3 2 1 v w Q: u, y 2 x 3 y r s 1 t u 0 1 v w Q: w, r r s x

y t u 1 0 2 3 2 1 v w Q: x, v, u r s 2 x y t u 1 0 2 3

2 1 2 3 v w x y Q: CSy477/677 - Lecture 19 r s 1 t u 0 2 1 v w Q: r, t, x r s 2 x y

t u 1 0 2 3 2 1 v w Q: v, u, y r s 2 x 3 y t u 1 0 2 3 2 1 v

w Q: 2 x 3 y Analysis of BFS 1. for each u V - {s} 2. do color[u] WHITE 3. d[u] 4. pred[u] = NIL 5. color[s] GRAY 6. d[s] 0 7. pred[s] = NIL 8.

Q 9. Q ENQUEUE(Q, s) O(|V|) (1) Analysis of BFS 10. while Q not empty do u DEQUEUE(Q) 11. 12. for each v in Adj[u] 13. do if color[v] = WHITE then color[v] = 14. GRAY 15. d[v] d[u] + 1 pred[v] = u 16. 17.

ENQUEUE(Q, v) (1) Scan Adj[u] for all vertices u in the graph Each vertex u is processed only once, when the vertex is dequeued Sum of lengths of all adjacency lists = (|E|)E|E|)) Scanning operations: O(|E|)E|E|)) (1) Shortest Paths Property BFS finds the shortest-path distance from the source vertex s V to each node in the graph Shortest-path distance = d(s, u) Minimum number of edges in any path from s to u source s r v t u 1 0 2

3 2 1 2 3 w x y Outline Graph Definition Graph Representation Path, Cycle, Tree, Connectivity Graph Traversal Algorithms Breath first search/traversal Depth first search/traversal

Depth-First Search Input: G = (V, E) (No source vertex given!) Goal: Explore edges of G to discover every vertex in V starting at most current visited node Search may be repeated from multiple sources Output: 2 timestamps on each vertex: d[v] = discovery time (time when v is first reached) f[v] = finishing time (done with examining vs adjacency list) Depth-first forest Depth-First Search: idea Search deeper in graph whenever possible explore edges of most recently discovered vertex v (that still has unexplored edges) After all edges of v have been explored, backtracks to parent of v Continue until all vertices reachable from original source have been discovered

If undiscovered vertices remain, choose one of them as a new source and repeat search from that vertex different from BFS!!! DFS creates a depth-first forest DFS Additional Data Structures Global variable: time-step Incremented when nodes are discovered/finished color[u] color of node u White not discovered, gray discovered and being processing and black when finished processing pred[u] predecessor of u (from which node we discover u) d[u] discovery (time when u turns gray) f[u] finish time (time when u turns black) 1 d[u] < f [u] 2 |E|)V|E|) WHITE 0 BLACK GRAY d[u] f[u] 2|E|)V|E|)

DFS(V, E): top level 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. u for each u V do color[u] WHITE pred[u] NIL time 0 x for each u V do if color[u] = WHITE then DFS-VISIT(u) v w y z Every time DFS-VISIT(u) is called, u becomes the root of a new tree in the depth-first forest DFS-VISIT(u): DFS exploration from u 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9.

10. color[u] GRAY time time+1 d[u] time for each v Adj[u] do if color[v] = WHITE then pred[v] u DFS-VISIT(v) color[u] BLACK //done with u time time + 1 f[u] time //finish time u v w x y z time = 1 u v w x y z u v

w 1/ 1/ x 2/ y z Example u v w 1/ u v 1/ w u 2/ v 1/ w

2/ 3/ x y z x y z x y z u v w u v w u v w 1/

2/ 1/ 2/ 1/ B 4/ 3/ 4/ 2/ B 3/ 4/5 3/ x y z x y z x y

z u v w u v w u v w 1/ 2/ 1/ B 4/5 x 2/7 1/ B 3/6 y 4/5

z x B F 3/6 y 4/5 z 2/7 x 3/6 y z Example (cont.) u v 1/8 u w 1/8 2/7 B

F 4/5 v 2/7 9/ 3/6 2/7 B F 4/5 v 1/8 B F 3/6 u w 4/5 w 9/ C 3/6 x

y z x y z x y z u v w u v w u v w 1/8 2/7 B F

4/5 C 3/6 9/ 10/ y z u v w 2/7 B F 4/5 x C 4/5 x 9/12 y 10/11 z

C 9/ 1/8 B 3/6 y 10/ z 2/7 B F 4/5 x 9/ C B 3/6 y 10/11 z The results of DFS may depend on: B 3/6

2/7 B F x 1/8 1/8 The order in which nodes are explored in procedure DFS The order in which the neighbors of a vertex are visited in DFS-VISIT Properties of DFS u = pred[v] DFS-VISIT(v) was called during a search of us adjacency list u 1/ v w 2/ u is the predecessor (parent) of v 3/ More generally, vertex v is a

descendant of vertex u in depth first forest v is discovered while u is gray x y z DAG Directed acyclic graphs (DAGs) Used to represent precedence of events or processes that have a partial order undershorts socks Put on socks before put on shoes pants shoes shirt belt No precedence between belts and shoes watch tie jacket Topological sort helps us establish a total order/linear order. Useful for task scheduling. Topological Sort

undershorts socks pants shoes shirt belt watch tie Topological sort of a directed acyclic graph G = (V, E): a linear order of vertices such that if there exists an edge (u, v), then u appears before v in the ordering. jacket socks undershorts pants shoes watch shirt belt Topological sort: an ordering of vertices so that all directed edges go from left to right.

tie jacket Topological Sort via DFS undershort s socks pants shoes shirt belt watch tie jacket TS requires that we put u before v if there is a path from u to v e.g., socks before shoes undershorts before jacket Observation: If we perform DFS on a DAG, if there is a path from u to v, then f[u]>f[v] So arrange nodes in Consider when DFS_visit(undershorts) is called, jacket is either reverseturn order of their * white: then jacket will be discovered in DFS_visit(undershorts), black, before eventually undershorts finishes. f[jacket] < f[undershorts] finish time

* black (if DFS_visit(jacket) was called): then f[jacket] < f[undershorts] * node jacket cannot be gray (which would mean that DFS_visit(jacket) is ongoing ) Topological Sort undershorts 11/ 16 pants 6/7 17/18 socks TOPOLOGICAL-SORT(V, E) 1. 12/15 shoes 13/14 shirt 1/8 belt watch 9/10 tie 2/5 2. jacket 3/4 socks undershorts pants Running time: (|E|)V|E|) + |E|)E|E|)) shoes

watch Call DFS(V, E) (to compute finishing times f[v] for each vertex v): when a node is finished, push it on to a stack pop nodes in stack and arrange them in a list shirt belt tie jacket Edge Classification* Via DFS traversal, graph edges can be classified into four types. When in DFS_visit (u), we follow edge (u,v) and find node, if v is: WHITE vertex: then (u,v) is a tree edge v was first discovered by exploring edge (u, v) GRAY node: then (u,v) is a Back edge (u, v) connects u to an ancestor v in a depth first tree Self loops (in directed graphs) are also

back edges u v w y z 1/ x (u,v) is a tree edge u v 1/ w 2/ B 4/ x 3/ y z (x,v) is a back edge

Edge Classification* if v is black vertex, and d[u] d[v], (u,v) is a Cross edge (u,v): go between vertices in same depth-first tree (as long as there is no ancestor / descendant relation) or between different depth-first trees

u v 1/8 2/7 B F 4/5 x w C 9/ 3/6 y z (w,y) is a cross edge Analysis of DFS(V, E) 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. for each u V do color[u] WHITE (|E|)V|E|)) pred[u] NIL time 0

for each u V (|E|)V|E|)) without do if color[u] = WHITE counting the time for then DFS-VISIT(u) DFS-VISIT Analysis of DFS-VISIT(u) 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. color[u] GRAY DFS-VISIT is called exactly once for each vertex time time+1 d[u] time for each v Adj[u] do if color[v] = WHITE then pred[v] u Each loop takes DFS-VISIT(v) |E|)Adj[u]|E|) color[u] BLACK time time + 1 f[u] time Total: uV |E|)Adj[u]|E|) + (|E|)V|E|)) = (|E|)E|E|)) = (|E|)V|E|) + |E|)E|E|)) DFS without recursion* Data Structure: use stack (Last In First Out!) to store all gray nodes Pseudocode:

1. Start by push source node to stack 2. Explore node at stack top, i.e., * push its next white adj. node to stack) * if all its adj nodes are black, the node turns black, pop it from stack 3. Continue (go back 2) until stack is empty 4. If there are white nodes remaining, go back to 1 using another white node as source node Parenthesis Theorem* In any DFS of a graph G, for all u, v, exactly one of the following holds: y z 3/6 2/9 1/10 11/16 4/5 7/8 12/13 14/15 v u x 1. [d[u], f[u]] and [d[v], f[v]] are disjoint, and neither of u and v is

s w t s a descendant of the other t v z 2. [d[v], f[v]] is entirely within [d[u], f[u]] and v is a descendant w y of u u x 3. [d[u], f[u]] is entirely within [d[v], f[v]] and u is a descendant of v 1 2 3 4

5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 (s (z (y (x x) y) (w w) z) s) (t (v v) (u u) Well-formed expression: parenthesis are properly nested t) Other Properties of DFS* Corollary u

Vertex v is a proper descendant of u d[u] < d[v] < f[v] < f[u] 1/8 2/7 B F 4/5 3/6 Theorem (White-path Theorem) u 1/ v 9/12 B v In a depth-first forest of a graph G, vertex v is a descendant of u if and only if at time d[u], there is a path u v consisting of only white vertices. C 2/ 10/11 Cycle detection via DFS A directed graph is acyclic a DFS on G yields no back edges. v Proof:

: acyclic no back edge Assume back edge prove cycle Assume there is a back edge (u, v) v is an ancestor of u there is a path from v to u in G (v u) v u + the back edge (u, v) yield a cycle (u, v) u three graph algorithms Shortest Distance Paths Distance/Cost of a path in weighted graph sum of weights of all edges on the path path A,B,E, cost is 2+3=5 path A, B, C, E, cost is 2+1+4=7 How to find shortest distance path from a node, A, to all another node? assuming: all weights are positive This implies no cycle in the shortest distance path Why? Prove by contradiction. If A->B->C->..->B->D is shortest path, then A->B->D is a shorter! d[u]: the distance of the shortest-distance path from A to u d[A] = 0 d[D] = min {d[B]+2, d[E]+2} because B, E are the two only possible previous node in path to D Dijkstra Algorithm Input: positive weighted graph G, source node s Output: shortest distance path from s to all other nodes that is reachable from s Expanding frontier (one hop a time) 1). Starting from A: We can go to B with cost B, go to C with cost 1 S going to all other nodes (here D, E) has to pass B or C are there cheaper paths to go to C?

are there cheaper paths to B? 2). Where can we go from C? B, E Two new paths: (A,C,B), (A,C,E) Better paths than before? => update current optimal path Are there cheaper paths to B? 3). Where can we go from B? for each node u, keep track pred[u] (previous node in the path leading to u), d[u] current shortest distance dist Q: C(2), B(4), D, E Q: B(3), D(6), E(7) Q: D(5), E(6) Q: E(6) pred A: null B: A C: A D: null, E: null A: null B: C C: A D: C, E: C best paths to each node via nodes circled & associated distance A: null B: C

C: A D: B, E: B A: null B: C C: A D: B, E: B Dijkstra Alg Demo dist Q: D(5), E(6) Q: E(6) pred A: null B: C C: A D: B, E: B A: null B: C C: A D: B, E: B best paths to each node via nodes circled & associated distance Dijkstra Alg Demo Dijkstras algorithm & snapshot

H: priority queue (min-heap in this case) C(dist=1), B(dist=2), D(dist=inf), E (dist=inf) s=A prev=A dist=2 prev=n il dist=inf prev=n il dist=0 prev=A dist=1 prev=n il dist=inf Minimum Spanning Trees Minimum Spanning Tree Problem: Given a weighted graph, choose a subset of edges so that resulting subgraph is connected, and the total weights of edges is minimized to minimize total weights, it never pays to have cycles, so resulting connection graph is connected, undirected, and acyclic, i.e., a tree. Applications: Communication networks Circuit design Layout of highway systems

Formal Definition of MST Given a connected, undirected, weighted graph G = (V, E), a spanning tree is an acyclic subset of edges T E that connects all vertices together. cost of a spanning tree T : the sum of edge weights in the spanning tree w(T) = (u,v)T w(u,v) A minimum spanning tree (MST) is a spanning tree of minimum weight. Minimum Spanning Trees Given: Connected, undirected, weighted graph, G Find: Minimum - weight spanning tree, T Acyclic subset of edges(E) that connects all vertices of G. Notice: there are many spanning trees for a graph We want to find the one with the minimum cost Such problems are optimization problems: there are multiple viable solutions, we want to find best (lowest cost, best perf) one. Greedy Algorithms A problem solving strategy (like divide-and-conquer) Idea: build up a solution piece by piece, in each step always choose the option that offers best immediate benefits (a myopic approach) Local optimization: choose what seems best right now not worrying about long term benefits/global benefits Sometimes yield optimal solution, sometimes yield

suboptimal (i.e., not optimal) Sometimes we can bound difference from optimal Minimum Spanning Trees Given: Connected, undirected, weighted graph, G Find: Minimum - weight spanning tree, T How to greedily build a spanning tree? * Always choose lightest edge? Might lead to cycle. * Repeat for n-1 times: find next lightest edge that does not introduce cycle, add the edge into tree => Kruskals algorithm Kruskals Algorithm Implementation detail: * Maintain sets of nodes that are connected by tree edges * find(u): return the set that u belongs to * find(u)=find(v) means u, v belongs to same group (i.e., u and v are already connected) Minimum Spanning Trees Given: Connected, undirected, weighted graph, G Find: Minimum - weight spanning tree, T Example: Suppose we start grow tree from C, step 1. A has lightest edge to tree, add A and the edge (A-C) to tree // tree is now A-C step 2: D has lightest edge to tree add D and the edge (C-D) to tree . How to greedily build a spanning tree? * Grow the tree from a node (any node), * Repeat for n-1 times: * connect one node to the tree by choosing node with lightest edge connecting to tree nodes This is Prim algorithm.

Prims Algorithm cost[u]: stores weight of lightest edge connecting u to current tree It will be updated as the tree grows deletemin() takes node v with lowest cost out * this means node v is done(added to tree) // v, and edge v - prev(v) added to tree H is a priority queue (usually implemented as heap, here its min-heap: node with lostest cost at root) Summary Graph everywhere: represent binary relation Graph Representation Adjacent lists, Adjacent matrix Path, Cycle, Tree, Connectivity Graph Traversal Algorithm: systematic way to explore graph (nodes) BFS yields a fat and short tree App: find shortest hop path from a node to other nodes DFS yields forest made up of lean and tall tree

App: detect cycles and topological sorting (for DAG)

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