Steps to Informative FSA - English with Mrs. Sands

Steps to Informative FSA - English with Mrs. Sands

The writers purpose is to increase the readers knowledge, to help the reader better understand a procedure or process, or to increase the readers comprehension of a concept. We use informative writing everyday: The news When you want to learn about a new topic, like: your favorite sport/team, a new band you

are interested in, how that awesome video game was made, or your favorite place to STEP 1: READ THE PROMPT Find the directions and read the prompt. Underline the prompt command Now write. Look for words like explain or inform.

STEP 2: DETERMINE MODE OF WRITING Determine if the directions are asking for an Explanatory /Informative Essay or an Argumentative Essay Words like explain, describe, or give reasons would indicate an informative mode of writing. Verbs like take a position or write a claim would indicate an argumentative mode of writing.

STEP 3: READ/ANNOTATE THE TEXT Read the text provided. As you read, look for evidence that provides examples of the points you want to make in your essay. Highlight or underline the information you will quote or paraphrase (put in your own wordsyes we cite when we paraphrase!). Highlight or underline the authors name and the title of the text. STEP 4: PLAN YOUR ESSAY

Write a plan or outline that you can use as you find and/or plug in textual evidence from the text or articles. Thesis Statement (main idea of your paper) 1.Transition + Topic Sentence

A. textual evidence with citation 2. Transition + Topic Sentence A. textual evidence with citation STEP 5: BEGIN WRITING ESSAY Reread the prompt. Check your outline to be sure it connected to the prompt. Begin writing your essay. It doesnt matter if you start with the introduction paragraph OR start with your body paragraphs. You can always come back to the

introduction paragraph- just make sure you leave room to write. ***We will practice writing an introduction and conclusion paragraph next week!*** If you get stuck on one part, skip lines and move onto the next part. You can always go back and fill in or change sentences. I. First Body Paragraph A. Transition (i.e. To Commence) + topic sentence (main focus of paragraph) B. Sentences of explanation that lead to textual evidence

C. Attribution, quote (cite). According to [article or author], (last name pg#). D. Analysis: Link the textual evidence to your main idea of the paragraph, the point you are making, and connect to it to your textual evidence. Ask yourself: How does your paragraph support your thesis statement? II. Second Body Paragraph A. Transition (In addition, furthermore) + topic sentence (main focus of second body paragraph)

B. Sentences of explanation that lead to textual evidence C. Attribution, quote (cite). According to [article or author], (last name pg#). D. Analysis: Link the textual evidence to your main idea of the paragraph, the point you are making, and connect to it to your textual evidence. III. Third Body Paragraph A. Transition (Lastly, to continue, finally) + topic sentence (main focus of third body paragraph)

B. Sentences of explanation that lead to textual evidence C. Attribution, quote (cite). According to [article or author], (last name pg#). D. Analysis: Link the textual evidence to your main idea of the paragraph, the point you are making, and connect to it to your textual evidence. Ask yourself: How does your paragraph support your thesis statement? Does your additional details from the text support your Scan the QR

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