Outline for Monday 5 November 2012: Resisting Reform:

Outline for Monday 5 November 2012: Resisting Reform:

Outline for Monday 5 November 2012: Resisting Reform: Revolutionary Rhetoric & Counter-revolution in the 1 st Republic Weeks #6 & #7 Readings: Henretta, pp. 162-193; 194-226; Holton, pp. 45-77; 78-111 Discussion Themes (weeks 6 & 7): Week 6 Themes: 1. Who were the Loyalists and how did their experience compare with the arguments of those who favored a revolution at the outset of the war?? 2. What was republicanism and how did that concept relate to the effects of the war on noncombatants? 3. How did revolutionary rhetoric influence the first state constitutions and the Articles of Confederation? Week 7 Themes: 4. Why did opponents of the Articles of Confederation gain influence during the First Republic (1780s)?

5. How did economic legacies of war affect post-war arguments for constitutional reform? 6. How did Constitutional reforms of 1787-1791 affect the American ideology of republicanism? 7. What were the implications of Constitutional Reforms of 1787-1789 for African Americans? 8. How did race relations and slavery affect American decisions for war in 1811-1815? What were the consequences of the war for American national identity? Before Next Meeting (Wednesday) Review Readings:

Henretta, pp. 161-192; 193-224 Holton, Part Two, Chapters 1, 2, 3 & 4 (and review chapters 1 & 2) Prepare to present assigned voices as scheduled (from Holton textno on-line module for Week #7) Note: Analysis Paper #2 due 19 November 2011 (Monday before Thanksgiving). Question will be provided next week during class and will focus on the Holton text and other readings for weeks 6, 7, and 8 (including on-line module for week 8)

Divided Sympathies: Reasons for Loyalist vs support for Insurgency? Why are some areas more likely to be Loyal to British? Where are Insurgents more likely to find support? Presentations (W6&7): Week 5 Make History Website

Conaachan, Chelsea; Hoffman, Ciarra: Quaker Abolitionist (John Woolman), Whom I must Join (Eliz. Ashbridge), Defense of Slavery in Virgiinia (Peter Fontaine) Week Six Primary Sources: (from Holton text, ch. 1 & 2) Engel, Stephanie; Daniel, Courtney: Briton Hammon, A Narrative of Uncommon Sufferings; and Anthony Benezet, Some historical Account of Guinea Folger, Rachel; Haslam, Angela: Phillis Wheatley, [2 poems &a letter to Samson Occom]; and John Murray, Lord Dunmore, A Proclamation Howell, Jenny; McDonald, Jordan: Thomas Jefferson, Original Rough Draft; and Letter from Monmouth County and Deposition Ontko, McKenna; Schofield, Paul: Saul, Petition to VA Legislature & Jehu Grant Pension Application; and Jacob Francis, Pension Application

Week Seven Primary Sources: (from Holton text, ch 3 &4) Segol, Ruth Anne; Tolleson, Caitlin: Nero Brewster and John Cuffee petitions (to NH & MA legislatures); William Cushing, Quok Walker &Susan Sedgwick, Elisabeth Freeman Whitten, Brian; Siter, Michele: Citizens of Halifax County (petition to VA leg.) and Prince Hall (petition to MA leg.); Absalom Jones (2 documents); William Nell, Colored Patriots Eby, Emily; Freeman, Ashley: Rose Fortune and Captain William Booth; Benjamin Banneker and Thomas Jefferson (letters) The Century of Imperial Wars King Williams War (1689-1697; War of the League of AugsburgBritain vs France, Spain, Austria)

Queen Annes War (1702-1713; War of the Spanish SuccessionBritain vs France and Spain) War of Jenkinss Ear (1739-1741; English seek markets in Spanish AmericaWalpoles policy of trade expansion) King Georges War (1740-1748; Capture & return of Louisbourg) French and Indian War (Seven Years War, 1753-1763) American Revolution (17751783) Theaters of War 1. Frontier Forts

2. Privateering 3. Urban seaports 4. Kidnapping and raiding parties 5. Runaways and rebellions 6. Casualty rates and War widows 7. Land bounty warrants British Imperial Concerns after Treaty of Paris, 1763 Postwar Military

outposts in British North America: 1. How do troop placements affect colonial economies? 2. How do troop withdrawals or relocation affect colonial economies? 3. How do Indian allies respond to British authority? American Reactions after 1763 1.

Pontiacs Rebellion (1763Indian response to settler encroachments forces British intervention to separate parties) Smuggling activities escalate in port cities (Boston, NY, Phil) Stamp Act Rioting (14-27 August 1765) legitimates erosion of deference and hegemony in major port cities 2. 3. 4. 5.

Non-importation agreements & Daughters of Liberty initiatives Sons of Liberty gain support after success of Declaratory Act 6. 7. 8. Ebeneezer MacIntosh & Bostons waterfront workers Benjamin Franklin & Philadelphias directed protests & petitions (1765-66) Intimidation tactics (hanging in effigy, posted warnings)

Physical attacks (individuals targeted and terrorized to force non-compliance) Boston Tea Party and the destruction of private property (British East India Company ships and cargo) Organization of illegal militias and procurement of illegal weapons and arms (the Minutemen and the Sons of Liberty Attacks on military outposts and storage facilities Military outposts in British North America on the eve of the Quebec Act 1. Where are troops located & why? 2. What are the apparent priorities of the British in this structure? 3. How does the location of troops affect economic development?

a. Implications for political development? b. Implications for local friction? 4. Where does revolutionary violence emerge? 5. Where is British authority most secure? 6. How does troop placement in Quebec compare with New England? British emancipation of American Slaves: The Black Loyalists: 1. Military Service, 1775-1780

2. Emigration, 1780-1783 Turning Points: 1775-1777 Endgame: 1778-1783 What are Indian interests during the American Revolution? How do the goals and concerns of the colonists affect Native peoples?

What are the implications for a British victory? How does the American alliance with Spanish and French affect Indian concerns? Western Confederacy: 1783-1795 1. Organized in response to Treaty of Paris, 1783 2. Included Shawnee, Chipewayan,Ottawa, Miami, and various smaller groups 3. Issued the Detroit Resolutions in 1784 as a Declaration of Independence and

Statement of Principles: a. Organized all Indian people in the Ohio Country as a European-style nation b. Declared the Ohio River as the boundary of the Western Confederacy c. Demanded U.S. recognize the existence of the Western Confederacy as a nation d. Required U.S. Congress deal with the Western Confederacy, not individual tribes e. Rejected the conquest theory of negotiations (Indians not party to the Treaty of Paris in 1783) f. Declared new treaty necessary to govern relations between the two new nations (British having abdicated their responsibilities) 4. Ended with Treaty of Greenville, 1795 (after battle of Fallen Timbers, 1794) Spanish North America in aftermath of 1783 Treaty of Paris

Congressional Hall, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 17751800: 1. Annual meetings of the Congress, 1777-1789 2. Charles Thompson and History of the Congress, 1776-1789 3. George Washington and Thompsons History, 1789--? Governing the New Republic: The Articles of Confederation, 1777-89 1. Congressional Accomplishments

under the Articles: Won the nations most difficult and longest domestic war (1775-83) Tripled the size of the country with the peace settlement of 1783 Solved the most serious and

disabling debt in the nations history (Federal Revenue Plan, 1783) Established the framework for Imperial expansion of the New Nation (NW Ordinances of 1784-7) Resolved conflicting land claims in the West

Resolved conflicting tariff schedules among the states 2. Presidents under the Articles: Prominent Presidents of the United States, 1774-1789 1. Peyton Randolph, 1774 (First Continental Congress) 2. Richard Henry Lee, 1775 (First year of Revolutionary War, organizing & arming Continental Army, establishing a treasury, gaining international recognition, establishing a union of states) 3. John Hancock, 1776 (First signature on Declaration of Independence)

4. Richard Henry Lee, 1777 (First President under Articles of Confederation: President of These United States Assembled) 5. Richard Henry Lee, 1784 (First president after Paris Peace of 1783 formally certifies British acceptance of US independence) 6. George Washington, 1789 (6th president after Paris Peace settlement, 16 th president of the United States, 1st president under the Constitution of 1789) Expanding Territorial claims, 1782-1802 How does territorial expansion affect ideals of republicanism? How does territorial

expansionism affect race relations? How does territorial expansion affect political organizing? NW Ordinances of 17851787 (accomplished under the Articles of Confederation): 1. Resolved conflicting land claims 2. Secured primary source

of revenue for federal government, 1787-1861 3. Prohibited the expansion of slavery Presentations (W6&7): Week 5 Make History Website Conaachan, Chelsea; Hoffman, Ciarra: Quaker Abolitionist (John Woolman), Whom I must Join (Eliz. Ashbridge), Defense of Slavery in Virgiinia (Peter Fontaine)

Week Six Primary Sources: (from Holton text, ch. 1 & 2) Engel, Stephanie; Daniel, Courtney: Briton Hammon, A Narrative of Uncommon Sufferings; and Anthony Benezet, Some historical Account of Guinea Folger, Rachel; Haslam, Angela: Phillis Wheatley, [2 poems &a letter to Samson Occom]; and John Murray, Lord Dunmore, A Proclamation Howell, Jenny; McDonald, Jordan: Thomas Jefferson, Original Rough Draft; and Letter from Monmouth County and Deposition Ontko, McKenna; Schofield, Paul: Saul, Petition to VA Legislature & Jehu Grant Pension Application; and Jacob Francis, Pension Application

Week Seven Primary Sources: (from Holton text, ch 3 &4) Segol, Ruth Anne; Tolleson, Caitlin: Nero Brewster and John Cuffee petitions (to NH & MA legislatures); William Cushing, Quok Walker &Susan Sedgwick, Elisabeth Freeman Whitten, Brian; Siter, Michele: Citizens of Halifax County (petition to VA leg.) and Prince Hall (petition to MA leg.); Absalom Jones (2 documents); William Nell, Colored Patriots Eby, Emily; Freeman, Ashley: Rose Fortune and Captain William Booth; Benjamin Banneker and Thomas Jefferson (letters) Before Next Meeting (Wednesday) Review Readings:

Henretta, pp. 161-192; 193-224 Holton, Part Two, Chapters 1, 2, 3 & 4 (and review chapters 1 & 2) Prepare to present assigned voices as scheduled (from Holton textno on-line module for Week #7) Note: Analysis Paper #2 due 19 November 2011 (Monday before Thanksgiving). Question will be provided next week during class and will focus on the Holton text and other readings for weeks 6, 7, and 8 (including on-line module for week 8)

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