Chemotherapy Services in England: Ensuring quality and safety

Chemotherapy Services in England: Ensuring quality and safety

Chemotherapy Services in England: Ensuring quality and safety Prof. Mike Richards November 2008 Chemotherapy services: Background 1. Massive increase in utilization of chemotherapy: Around 60% in 4 years. 2. Undoubted benefits for many thousands of patients Significant concerns about quality and safety of some services:

NPSA alert on oral chemotherapy 2008 Cancer Peer Review national overview report 2008 NCEPOD report 2008 Chemotherapy services: Concerns (1) NPSA Rapid Response Alert on oral chemotherapy: January 2008 3 deaths and 400 incidents reported over 4 years

Wrong dosage, frequency, quantity or duration Particularly important as oral drug usage is likely to increase Chemotherapy services: Concerns (2) Cancer Peer Review: 2004-2007 163 clinical chemotherapy services appraised

Concerns regarding leadership arrangements for emergency admissions and standards of safety and dignity in some facilities Only 46% of services had network wide lists of agreed acceptable regimens Only 40% had e-prescribing Chemotherapy services: Concerns 3 NCEPOD report: November 2008

35% - care judged as good 49% - room for improvement 8% - unsatisfactory Need to get the basics right e.g. consent, performance status, investigations, recording of toxicities, prescribing

Need to focus on management of complications National Chemotherapy Advisory Group Draft report Chemotherapy Services in England: Ensuring Quality and Safety Consultation to start November 2008 Sets out actions which are needed to respond to NPSA, Cancer Peer Review and NCEPOD

Does not deal with improving access to cancer medicines or variations in uptake of NICE approved drugs. These are being dealt with elsewhere Chemotherapy Services in England: Ensuring Quality and Safety Introduction Chemotherapy Care Pathway Models of service delivery

Infrastructure (leadership, clinical governance, workforce and training, data and IT) Commissioning The Chemotherapy Care Pathway Step 1 Access and referral to an oncologist Step 2 Assessment and decision to treat Step 3

Prescribing first cycle Step 4 Dispensing Step 5 Delivery and treatment environment Step 6 Patient and carer information, education support and advice Step 7 Urgent assessment and management of complications

Step 8 Prescribing subsequent cycles Step 9 End of treatment record and subsequent care plan Key recommendations Actions related to: 1. Elective chemotherapy services 2. Acute oncology (management of complications and

management of emergency admissions with previously undiagnosed cancer) Involves A&E and acute medicine as well as oncology disciplines Acute oncology All hospitals with an A&E should establish an acute oncology service bringing together emergency medicine, acute medicine and oncology disciplines Local policies and procedures (agreed with network)

Training of junior doctors and other staff 24 hour access to specialist oncological advice Routine audit of emergency admissions with cancer Assessment, decision to treat and consent Consultants to initiate programmes of chemotherapy unless circumstances are exceptional Standardised consent forms with recording of both

common and severe toxicities (and copies for patients) Provision of written information mandatory Prescribing and dispensing Up to date lists of designated staff for prescribing (first and subsequent cycles), verification and dispensing Protocols to be agreed across networks and to be readily available and kept up to date

Eliminate handwritten prescriptions for parenteral chemotherapy Delivery: Improving patients experience Good capacity planning (C-PORT) Localise services where clinically appropriate Streamline services to minimise delays

Ensure facilities are fit for purpose Information, education, support and advice All patients should receive written and verbal information about treatment, side effects and who to contact (day and night) All patients should have access to 24 hour telephone advice and triage Proactive telephone follow up to detect problems early should be strongly considered

Urgent assessment and Management of Complications All patients should know where to go (day or night) All hospitals with A&E to have an acute oncology service (may be treat and transfer) Policies for complications (e.g. neutropenic sepsis) Acute oncology team to be informed within 24 hours of presentation to A& and/or acute admission

End of treatment record Summary of treatment for case records, GP and patient Subsequent care plan Models of service delivery Level 3: Comprehensive 24/7 service covering all cancers and all forms of systemic treatment Level 2: 24/7 services for a more limited range of

cancers/treatments Level 1: A satellite service providing non-complex chemotherapy closer to home Note: Levels 2 and 3 should both include an acute oncology service if provided on a site with A&E Leadership teams Elective chemotherapy services Acute oncology services Roles:

Capacity planning; clinical governance; workforce and training; patient information and support; financial management; facilities and IT Clinical governance and peer review All chemotherapy services to reassess themselves urgently against current peer review measures and take account of NCAG recommendations Peer Review measures to be updated/expanded

Further self assessment followed by peer review Workforce and training NCAT and cancer networks to develop routine collection of workforce numbers for chemotherapy nurses and oncology pharmacists New competencies to be developed especially for acute oncology New training programmes to be developed

New roles (e.g. consultant nurses/pharmacists and chemotherapy support workers) to be encouraged Data and IT Core chemotherapy dataset to be defined Collection will then be mandatory (commitment made in the Cancer Reform Strategy) E-prescribing strongly recommended Summary

There are very real concerns about the quality and safety of some chemotherapy services The NCAG report responds to these concerns and requires urgent action from commissioners and providers

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