Recommendations of the Expert Panel to Define Removal

Recommendations of the Expert Panel to Define Removal

Recommendations of the Expert Panel to Define Removal Rates for Individual Stream Restoration Projects Presentation at Water Quality Goal Implementation Team Meeting May 13, 2013 Status of Expert Panel Report Expert Panel Reached Consensus and Review Period Completed Briefing of Federal Stream Permitting Agencies in March Response to 150 Pages of Comments and Revised Report Released in Feb

Approval by WQTWG in April and Final Version Prepared (EPA, PADEP, VADCR, WVDEP, Consultants, JHU, MSRA) Urban Stormwater Technical Work Group approval in Feb Agricultural Work Group approval in May Seeking WQGIT approval today Expert Panel on Stream Restoration Panelist Deb Cappuccitti

Bob Kerr Matthew Meyers, PE Affiliation Maryland Department of Environment Kerr Environmental Services (VA) Fairfax County (VA) Dept of Public Works and Environmental Services Atkins (MD) Biohabitats (MD) Center for Watershed Protection (MD) Baltimore County Dept of Env. Protection and Sustainability (MD) Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection West Virginia Department of Environmental Protection District Department of Environment Franklin and Marshall College University of Maryland University of Maryland US Environmental Protection Agency CBPO Virginia Department of Environmental Quality

Daniel E. Medina, PE Joe Berg Lisa Fraley-McNeal Steve Stewart Dave Goerman Natalie Hartman Josh Burch Dr. Robert C. Walter Dr. Sujay Kaushal Dr. Solange Filoso Julie Winters Bettina Sullivan Panel Support Tom Schueler Chesapeake Stormwater Network (facilitator) Bill Stack Center for Watershed Protection (co-facilitator) Other Panel Support: Russ Dudley Tetra Tech, Debra Hopkins Fish and Wildlife Service, Molly Harrington, CBP CRC, Norm Goulet, Chair Urban Stormwater Work Group, Gary

Shenk, EPA CBPO, Jeff Sweeney, EPA CBPO Review of the Old Rate Initial CBP-Approved Stream Restoration Credit (2003) Removal Rate per Linear Foot of Qualifying Stream Restoration Source TN TP TSS Spring Branch 0.02 lbs 0.0035 2.55 lbs N=1 At some point applied to non-urban stream restoration projects. Approved Interim Rate Edge-of-Stream 2011 Interim Approved Removal Rates per Linear Foot of

Qualifying Stream Restoration (lb/ft/yr) Source TN TP TSS* New Interim CBP 0.20 0.068 310 (54.2) Rate Derived from six stream restoration monitoring studies: Spring Branch, Stony Run, Powder Mill Run, Moore's Run, Beaver Run, and Beaver Dam Creek located in Maryland and Pennsylvania *The removal rate for TSS is representative of edge-of-field rates and is subject to a sediment delivery ratio in the CBWM to determine the edge-of-stream removal rate. Additional information about the sediment delivery ratio is provided in Appendix B. Why the initial credit needed to be changed and a universal restoration credit doesnt make sense

Streambank Erosion Rate (lb/ft/yr) 100,000 Edge-of-Field Erosion Rate (lb/ft/yr) 10,000 Interim Restoration Credit 1,000 100 Initial Restoration Credit USGS Data Supports Stream Bank Erosion as a Major Source to the Bay

Summary of Recommended Protocols Protocol 1: Credit for Prevented Sediment during Storm Flow -- This protocol provides an annual mass nutrient and sediment reduction credit for qualifying stream restoration practices that prevent channel or bank erosion that would otherwise be delivered downstream from an actively enlarging or incising urban stream. Protocol 2: Credit for Instream and Riparian Nutrient Processing during Base Flow -- This protocol provides an annual mass nitrogen reduction credit for qualifying projects that include design features to promote denitrification during base flow within the stream channel through hyporheic exchange within the riparian corridor. Protocol 3: Credit for Floodplain Reconnection Volume-- This protocol provides an annual mass

sediment and nutrient reduction credit for qualifying projects that reconnect stream channels to their floodplain over a wide range of storm events. Protocol 4: Credit for Dry Channel Regenerative Stormwater Conveyance (RSC) as an Upland Stormwater Retrofit-- This protocol provides an annual nutrient and sediment reduction rate for the contributing drainage area to a qualifying dry channel RSC project. The rate is determined by the degree of stormwater treatment provided in the upland area using the retrofit rate adjustor curves developed by the Stormwater Retrofit Expert Panel. Stream Restoration Protocols 1. Prevented sediment approach 3. Flood plain reconnection 2. In-stream denitrification 4. The tweener Dry Channel RSC

Protocol 1: Credit for Prevented Sediment during Storm Flow This protocol provides an annual mass nutrient and sediment reduction credit for qualifying stream restoration practices that prevent channel or bank erosion that would otherwise be delivered downstream from an actively enlarging or incising urban stream. Estimate stream sediment erosion rates Convert erosion rates to nitrogen and phosphorus loadings Estimate reduction efficiency attributed to restoration Protocol 1: Credit for Prevented Sediment during Storm Flow Step1.Estimate Stream Sediment Erosion Rates Using the BANCS Method Streambank Characteristic s used to

develop BEHI Velocity Gradient and Near-Bank Stress Indices Protocol 1: Credit for Prevented Sediment during Storm Flow Regional Curve for Determining R in equation: S = (CAR) Curve for Hickey Run Washington DCUSFWS Protocol 1: Credit for Prevented Sediment during Storm Flow Step 2.Convert erosion rates to loadings S=(c x A x R ) / 2,000 Where: S = sediment load (ton/year) for reach

or stream c = bulk density of soil (lbs/cubic foot) R = bank erosion rate (feet/year) (from regional curve) A = eroding bank area (square feet) 2,000 = conversion from lbs to tons Multiply sediment load times TN and TP concentrations Table 5: TN and TP Concentrations in Sediments in Different Parts of the Urban Landscape 1 Location Upland Soils Median TP 0.045 Median TN 0.8

Street Solids 0.52 TP Range 0.00250.577 0.19-0.72 TN Range 0.05-3.3 Location MD 1.08 0.324-2.71 MD

Diblasi, 2008 Catch Basin3 0.49 0.057-0.97 1.74 0.055-6.27 MD Law et al. 2008 BMP Sediments Streambank Sediments

0.29 0.014-1.38 1.47 0.11-5.6 National Schueler, 1994 0.439 0.19-0.90 -- --

MD BDPW, 2006 0.445 0.072-4.43 1.35 0.0015-4.13 MD Stewart, 2008 1.61 0.357

0.23-4.69 3.81 1.1 0.7-1.7 MD PA Stewart, 2012 Land Studies, 20052 1.05 -- 2.28 --

PA Walters et al, 20072 Reference Pouyat et al. 2007 all units are lb/ton the Pennsylvania data on stream bank sediments were in rural/agricultural subwatersheds 3 catch basin values are for sediment only, excluding leaves 1 2 Protocol 2: Credit for Denitrification in the Hyporheic Zone during Base Flow (for projects that qualify for Protocol 1 but not Protocol 3) Step 1.Determine the total post construction stream length that has been reconnected using the bank height ratio of 1.0 or less (for NCD)

or the 1.0 inch storm (other design approaches that do not use the bank full storm) Step 2. Determine the dimensions of the hyporheic box Step 3. Multiply the hyporheic box mass by the unit denitrification rate 5 feet + stream width + 5 feet 5 feet depth Protocol 3: Credit for Floodplain Reconnection (for projects that qualify for Protocol 1 but not Protocol 2) Annual mass nutrient reduction credit for projects that reconnect stream channels to their floodplain over a wide range of storm events Protocol 3: Credit for Floodplain Reconnection Volumes during Storm Flow Step 1.Estimate the floodplain connection volume

Annual runoff volume going to floodplain wetlands when floodplain is accessed at 1.0 Annual runoff volume going to floodplain wetlands when floodplain is accessed at 0.5 In-channel flow Protocol 3: Credit for Floodplain Reconnection Volumes Step 2.Estimate the N and P removal rate attributable to floodplain reconnection (using Jordan 2009 study) Protocol 4: Dry Channel RSC as a Stormwater Retrofit The Panel decided to classify dry channel RSC systems as an upland stormwater retrofit. Designers should use the protocols developed by the Urban Stormwater Retrofit Expert Panel to derive the sediment and nutrient

removal rates. The general process is to determine runoff reduction credit from adjustor curves that determine TP, TN, and TSS removal rates based on the depth of rainfall captured over the contributing impervious area treated by the RSC. The final removal rate is then applied to the entire drainage area to the dry channel RSC project. Protocol 4: Dry Channel RSC as a Stormwater Retrofit Upland Restoration vs. Stream Restoration Comprehensive Watershed Restoration Approach Panel endorsed a comprehensive watershed approach to install restoration practices in the uplands, the stream corridor, and in appropriate

settings, within the stream itself No current science to recommend what proportion of practices should be applied to uplands vs. stream corridor Qualifying Conditions Stream restoration projects that are primarily designed to protect public infrastructure by bank armoring or rip rap do not qualify for a credit. The urban stream reach must be greater than 100 feet in length The project must utilize a comprehensive approach to stream restoration design, involving the channel and banks. Stream restoration project MUST provide a NET watershed removal benefit in order to be eligible for either a sediment or nutrient credit. NO removal credit will be granted for any project that is built to offset, compensate, or otherwise mitigate for an impact to a stream or waterway elsewhere in the watershed

Environmental Concerns Each project must comply with all state and federal permitting requirements, including 404 and 401 permits, which may contain conditions for pre-project assessment and data collection, as well as post construction monitoring. Stream restoration is a carefully designed intervention to improve the hydrologic, hydraulic, geomorphic, water quality, and biological condition of degraded urban streams, and cannot and should not be implemented for the sole purpose of nutrient or sediment reduction. There may be a few classes of legacy sediment stream restoration projects that do not fall into the preceding statement. Also, there may instances where limited bank stabilization is needed to protect critical public infrastructure (which may need to be mitigated and does not qualify for any sediment or reduction credits). Environmental Concerns A qualifying project must meet certain presumptive criteria to ensure that high- functioning

portions of the urban stream corridor are not used for in-stream stormwater treatment (i.e., where existing stream quality is still good). These may include one or more of the following: Geomorphic evidence of active stream degradation (i.e., BEHI score) An IBI of fair or worse Hydrologic evidence of floodplain disconnection Evidence of significant depth of legacy sediment in the project reach Stream restoration should be directed to areas of more severe stream impairment, and the use and design of a proposed project should also consider the level of degradation, the restoration needs of the stream, and the potential functional uplift. Before credits are granted, stream restoration projects will need to meet post-construction monitoring requirements, document successful vegetative establishment, and conduct initial project maintenance. A qualifying project must demonstrate that it will maintain or expand riparian vegetation in the stream corridor, and compensate for any project-related tree losses in project work areas. All qualifying projects must have a designated authority responsible for development of a project maintenance program that includes routine and long-term maintenance. Functional Uplift in Streams

5 minutes The Test-Drive Process Recommended protocols are new, somewhat complex and will require project-based interpretation on the part of practitioners and regulators alike. Panel strongly recommends that both groups should "test-drive" the protocols on real world projects over the next six months. Based on their collective experience, convene a Bay-wide meeting to develop any additional supplemental information or procedures to effectively implement the protocols. Series of webcast or workshops to deliver a clear and consistent message to the Bay stream restoration community on how to apply the protocols. Initial Verification of Performance Prior to submitting the load reduction to the

state tracking database, the installing agency will need to provide a post-construction certification that the stream restoration project: was installed properly, meets or exceeds its functional restoration objectives hydraulically and vegetatively stable, Initial verification is provided either by the designer, local inspector or state permit authority Verification of Stream Restoration Credit Max duration for the removal credits is 5 years Credit is renewed based on a field performance inspection that verifies the project still exists, is adequately maintained and operating as designed. Credit is lost if project cannot be verified (i.e., does not pass inspection). This creates strong incentive for localities to

monitor the long term performance of their projects Reporting Requirements Historic Project Use interim efficienc y removal rate Stream Project Non-Conforming Project Use Interim removal

rate Reporting Needs: Length Date Installed Location More detailed project data and protocol computations to be archived in permit files, a subset of which may be audited or cross-checked by state agencies Conforming Project Use new Protocols Reporting Needs: Type Length

Protocol(s) Used 12 Digit Watershed Date Installed Location, DA and land cover treated Projected TSS, TP and TN Load Reduction Wetland area and FP connection storm Hyporheic box dimensions and BH ratio Questions?

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