Death of a Naturalist By Seamus Heaney Death

Death of a Naturalist By Seamus Heaney Death

Death of a Naturalist By Seamus Heaney Death of a All yearNaturalist the flax-dam festered in the heart Of the townland; green and heavy headed Flax had rotted there, weighted down by huge sods. Daily it sweltered in the punishing sun. Bubbles gargled delicately, bluebottles Wove a strong gauze of sound around the smell. There were dragon-flies, spotted butterflies, But best of all was the warm thick slobber Of frogspawn that grew like clotted water In the shade of the banks. Here, every spring I would fill jampotfuls of the jellied

Specks to range on window-sills at home, On shelves at school, and wait and watch until The fattening dots burst into nimbleSwimming tadpoles. Miss Walls would tell us how The daddy frog was called a bullfrog And how he croaked and how the mammy frog Laid hundreds of little eggs and this was Frogspawn. You could tell the weather by frogs too For they were yellow in the sun and brown In rain. Then one hot day when fields were rank With cowdung in the grass the angry frogs Invaded the flax-dam; I ducked through hedges To a coarse croaking that I had not heard Before. The air was thick with a bass chorus. Right down the dam gross-bellied frogs were cocked On sods; their loose necks pulsed like sails. Some hopped: The slap and plop were obscene threats. Some sat Poised like mud grenades, their blunt heads farting.

I sickened, turned, and ran. The great slime kings Were gathered there for vengeance and I knew That if I dipped my hand the spawn would clutch it. Seamus Heaney, New Selected Poems 1966 - 1987 How does our attitude change as we grow up? Make a list of things you may have done/ played with as a child, but would not enjoy now. E.g. Playing in the mud on rainy days. Jumping in puddles wearing your red Wellington boots. What has made your enjoyment of these things change? All year the flax-dam festered in the heart Of the townland; green and heavy headed Flax had rotted there, weighted down by huge sods. Daily it sweltered in the punishing sun.

Bubbles gargled delicately, bluebottles Wove a strong gauze of sound around the smell. There were dragon-flies, spotted butterflies, Underline the positive images or words in this section in red or using a dashed line. Underline the negative images or words in this section in black or using a solid line. Find examples of an oxymoron and a metaphor, then comment upon their purpose in the poem. Oxymoron An oxymoron is a figure of speech in which contradictory terms are used in conjunction. Giant dwarf Abundant poverty A fine mess Alone together

Military diplomacy Accurate rumours Falsely true Metaphor A metaphor is a figure of speech in which a thing is spoken of as being that which it resembles. e.g. He is a pig All year the flax-dam festered in the heart Of the townland; green and heavy headed Flax had rotted there, weighted down by huge sods. Daily it sweltered in the punishing sun. Bubbles gargled delicately, bluebottles Wove a strong gauze of sound around the smell. There were dragon-flies, spotted butterflies,

Positive images or words are underlined/ highlighted in red. Negative images or words are underlined/ highlighted in black. Oxymoron Metaphor But best of all was the warm thick slobber Of frogspawn that grew like clotted water In the shade of the banks. Here, every spring I would fill jampotfuls of the jellied Specks to range on window-sills at home, On shelves at school, and wait and watch until The fattening dots burst into nimbleSwimming tadpoles. 1. 2. Which phrase sounds like a child describing the scene? Identify the ugly image that would be appealing to a child.

3. Where has onomatopoeia bee used? 4. Where has a simile been used to describe the frog spawn? 5. Why are these techniques effective? 6. Underline other phrases that have been used to describe the frogspawn. 1 But best of all was the warm thick slobber Of frogspawn that grew like clotted water In the shade of the banks. Here, every spring 2 The warm thick slobber Of frogspawn 3 slobber

I would fill jampotfuls of the jellied Specks to range on window-sills at home, 4 like clotted water On shelves at school, and wait and watch until The fattening dots burst into nimbleSwimming tadpoles. 1. Which phrase sounds like a child describing the scene? 2. Identify the ugly image that would be appealing to a child. 3. Where has onomatopoeia bee used? 4.

Where has a simile been used to describe the frog spawn? 5. Why are these techniques effective? 6. Underline other phrases that have been used to describe the frogspawn. Miss Walls would tell us how The daddy frog was called a bullfrog And how he croaked and how the mammy frog Laid hundreds of little eggs and this was Frogspawn. You could tell the weather by frogs too For they were yellow in the sun and brown In rain.

How do we know the boys interest was created by a nature lesson at school? What is the tone of this first section of the poem? Then one hot day when fields were rank With cowdung in the grass the angry frogs Invaded the flax-dam; I ducked through hedges To a coarse croaking that I had not heard Before. The air was thick with a bass chorus. Right down the dam gross-bellied frogs were cocked On sods; their loose necks pulsed like sails. Some hopped: The slap and plop were obscene threats. Some sat Poised like mud grenades, their blunt heads farting. I sickened, turned, and ran. The great slime kings Were gathered there for vengeance and I knew That if I dipped my hand the spawn would clutch it. How is the tone of this section of the poem different

from the first stanza? How do we know that this section of the poem describes an experience later in the summer? Is it a pleasing image of the season? How are the developed frogs made to sound ugly and threatening? What is Heaney trying to say about man and nature in this poem? How do the use of positive and negative images reflect his ideas? Why does this experience cause the death of the naturalist?

Then one hot day when fields were rank With cowdung in the grass the angry frogs Invaded the flax-dam; I ducked through hedges To a coarse croaking that I had not heard Before. The air was thick with a bass chorus. Right down the dam gross-bellied frogs were cocked On sods; their loose necks pulsed like sails. Some hopped: The slap and plop were obscene threats. Some sat Poised like mud grenades, their blunt heads farting. I sickened, turned, and ran. The great slime kings Were gathered there for vengeance and I knew That if I dipped my hand the spawn would clutch it. How is the tone of this section of the poem different from the first stanza? How do we know that this section of the poem describes an experience

later in the summer? Is it a pleasing image of the season? ( ) How are the developed frogs made to sound ugly and threatening? ( ) What is Heaney trying to say about man and nature in this poem? How do the use of positive and negative images reflect his ideas? Why does this experience cause the death of the naturalist? ( )

Is this poem just about frogs? Why is it significant that this poem is written from an adult perspective, looking back on a childhood experience? What is being said about growing up? Heaney often represents aspects of nature as basic, ugly and threatening. Does this poem demonstrate this? Does this mean that Heaney doesnt like nature? Heaney loves to use the sound of words in his poems, to describe natural things very vividly. Find some examples of this from the poem

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