US Department of Energy - OHEP Accelerator R&D

US Department of Energy - OHEP Accelerator R&D

US Department of Energy - OHEP Accelerator R&D Task Force Report Stuart Henderson, FNAL May 10, 2012 History and Background There are two ideas relative to Accelerator R&D that we take as given now: That there is such a field as accelerator R&D which is focused on the long-range science and technology of accelerators That DOE/OHEP serves as the steward of long-range accelerator R&D There is another, closely related, idea that we are busy trying to make the case for: Accelerator technology benefits society in direct and tangible ways By pursuing fundamental R&D, we develop technology that creates jobs, improves our standard of living, and benefits society May 10, 2012 Overview: US DOE Accelerator R&D Task Force 2

1980: M. Tigner Panel Emphasized that support for long-range accelerator development was critical for the future of high energy physics and 4% of HEP operations funding is an appropriate funding level for advanced accelerator R&D This panel was largely responsible for establishing the proposal-based HEP program that has been funding long-range accelerator R&D for the past few decades May 10, 2012 Overview: US DOE Accelerator R&D Task Force 3 1994: J. Marx Panel DOE Office of Energy Research (OER) requested a broad assessment of the current status and promise of the field of accelerator physics and technology with respect to the five OER programs Executive Summary This subpanel believes that DOEhave de facto held a national trust for the stewardship of accelerator science and technology development. This has provided the foundation for essential capabilities needed both for the DOE mission and for addressing broader national interests Stewardship of accelerator science and technology should be acknowledged as an

explicit part of the overall DOE Energy Research mission. This requires Appropriate investment Support for training Each program to have proposal-driven, peer reviewed long-term accelerator R&D as part of its portfolio Charging OER advisory committees s with recommending the level of long-term accelerator R&D funding for each program OER program officers and laboratory managers to make a special effort to nurture societal applications May 10, 2012 Overview: US DOE Accelerator R&D Task Force 4 2006: Second J. Marx Panel HEPAP subpanel charged to undertake a comprehensive assessment of all aspects of the OHEP/ NSF accelerator R&D programs, addressing issues of

relevance to national goals, stewardship, scope, quality, relevance, resources, management and training Subpanel endorsed the importance and recommended that the mission of OHEP explicitly include providing program planning, oversight and funding for research in fundamental accelerator science and technology. May 10, 2012 Overview: US DOE Accelerator R&D Task Force 5 2006: Second J. Marx Panel Summary The subpanel emphasized the critical importance of accelerator science and technology to particle physics, other sciences and to the nation They found that there is an urgent need to strengthen accelerator science, technology and education in the US: Need to strengthen acc. sci. as an important scientific discipline

Need more opportunities for education and training Need to sustain the level and quality of short/medium term R&D Need to assure a healthy and stable program of long-term AARD Need more coherent management, oversight and planning for OHEP portfolio of accelerator R&D May 10, 2012 Overview: US DOE Accelerator R&D Task Force 6 DOE Accelerator R&D Programs May 10, 2012 Overview: US DOE Accelerator R&D Task Force 7 Accelerator R&D DOE/SC Program Contributions Courtesy: M. Procario Programs ASCR

Mid-term (facilitydriven) R&D 550 BES 10,646 HEP 51,091 NP 8,745 Total 71,032 Long-term (accel. sciencedriven) R&D - Directed

R&D Campaign 41,600 10,646 51,521* 41,600 Total 550 144,212 8,745 51,521* 164,153 * ILC (28,288), MAP (10,882) and LARP (12,351) Does not include very short-term R&D done on facility operations budgets 8 May 10, 2012 Overview: US DOE Accelerator R&D Task Force

Accelerator R&D By Thrust Total by Research Thrust Mid- and Long-term (excludes ILC, LARP and MAP) Accelerator, Beam and Computational Physics; 19,580; 17.38% Accelerator, Beam and Computational Physics Beam instrumentation and Control; 4,901; 4.35% Beam instrumentation and Control Superconducting RF; 36,777; 32.65% New Accelerator Concepts New Accelerator Concepts; 22,893; High Gradient Normal Conducting 20.33% Accelerator Structures Superconducting Magnets; 9,925; 8.81% Particle Sources; 8,142; 7.23%

Particle Sources Normal Conducting High Gradient RF Sources Accelerator Structures; 9,499; 8.43% Superconducting Magnets Superconducting RF RF Sources; 915; 0.81% May 10, 2012 Overview: US DOE Accelerator R&D Task Force 99 Accelerator R & D By Institution Total by Institution Mid and Long Term 90% of Accelerator R&D is carried out at National Labs BNL; 8,969

UNIVERSITIES; 11,644 ANL; 3,630 ANL BNL SLAC; 24,409 FNAL JLAB FNAL; 42,032 LBNL PPPL PPPL; 230 SLAC LBNL; 16,104 UNIVERSITIES JLAB; 5,615 OMB Accelerator R&D Briefing

1010 Taking the Next Step: Recognizing that Accelerator Technology Benefits Society in Direct and Tangible Ways May 10, 2012 Overview: US DOE Accelerator R&D Task Force 11 Accelerators for Americas Future Motivation: Show the uses and importance of accelerators by (for) the Nation To be used to make the case for Federal support Obtain assessments of the major technical challenges, most promising (transformational) areas of R&D, identify

obstacles to transfer of accelerator R&D to technology deployment To be used in establishing and managing a program with expanded scope Maintains US leadership and competitiveness in accelerator technology With HEP as the identified national steward Organize it to invove relevant federal programs/agencies, meets their needs and Improve transfer of basic accelerator research to technology deployment 12 Why another panel? Senate mark-up The Committee understands that powerful new accelerator technologies created for basic science and developed by industry will produce particle accelerators with the potential to address key economic and societal issues confronting our Nation. However, the Committee is concerned with the divide that exists in translating breakthroughs in accelerator science and technology into applications that benefit the marketplace and

American competitiveness. The Committee directs the Department to submit a 10-year strategic plan by June 1, 2012 for accelerator technology research and development to advance accelerator applications in energy and the environment, medicine, industry, national security, and discovery science. The strategic plan should be based on the results of the Departments 2010 workshop study, Accelerators for Americas Future, that identified the opportunities and research challenges for next-generation accelerators and how to improve coordination between basic and applied accelerator research. The strategic plan should also identify the potential need for demonstration and development facilities to help bridge the gap between development and deployment. May 10, 2012 Overview: US DOE Accelerator R&D Task Force 13 Larger National Priorities Presidential Memorandum on Accelerating Technology Transfer and Commercialization of Federal Research in Support of High Growth Businesses (Oct. 28, 2011) President Obama directed Agencies with Federal laboratories to establish performance goals to increase the number and pace of effective technology transfer and commercialization activities in partnership with non-federal entities, including private firms,

research organizations, and non-profit entities. 14 Overview: US DOE Accelerator R&D Task Force 14 Charge from Jim Siegrist, AD US DOE Office of High Energy Physics 1. 2. 3. 4. May 10, 2012 Summary of costs and time scales for previous successful accelerator R&D efforts to help us assess future funding profiles; Identification of those research opportunities that might have a strong potential for broad national benefits with relevance to the areas of energy and the environment, medicine, industry, national security and discovery science, along with the reasons why you believe they do; A summary, including an estimate (based on your knowledge and

expertise) of the current scope of work, resources invested, and status of the key research and technology areas identified, and; Identification of possible impediments (both technical and otherwise) to achieving successful demonstration; in particular, note as appropriate the underlying fundamental science challenges that need to be addressed, and how these relate to use-inspired and applied R&D. Overview: US DOE Accelerator R&D Task Force 15 Who are we why us? Sandra Biedron Colorado State University Lester Boeh Varian Medical Systems James Clayton Varian Medical Systems Stephen Gourlay LBNL Robert Hamm R&M Tech. Enterprises, Inc. Stuart Henderson FNAL Georg Hoffstaetter Cornell Norbert Holtkamp SLAC Lia Merminga TRIUMF Stephen Milton Colorado State University

Satoshi Ozaki BNL Fulvia Pilat JLab Marion White ANL George Zdasiuk Varian Medical Systems Michael Zisman DOE-HEP with tremendous support from Leah Hesla, Fermilab Communications May 10, 2012 Overview: US DOE Accelerator R&D Task Force 16 What did we do? How did we do it? https://slacportal.slac.stanford.edu/sites/ad_public/committees/Acc_RandD_TF_Blog/ default.aspx Community Blog Industry NSF, NIH, NCI, Defense, ONR DOE-OS OHEP BES-NP-FES-ASCR

Steward Steward for long lead R&D Reaching out: How can we help you? May 10, 2012 Overview: US DOE Accelerator R&D Task Force 17 What did the Accelerators for Americas Future report say about discovery science? For the past 60 years, particle accelerators have been the essential tools for discovery in: 1) Elementary particle physics 2) Nuclear physics 3) X-ray and photon science 4) Neutron science Critical accelerator R&D areas are important to the short-, medium-, and long-term future of these fields. Future breakthroughs in the discovery sciences will continue to rely on state-of-the-art particle accelerators

February 13, 2012 Discovery Science: US DOE Accelerator R&D Task Force 18 What did the Accelerators for Americas Future report say about defense and security? Defense and security needs for accelerators Stockpile stewardship War-fighter and asset protection Materials characterization Interrogation of cargo Inspection capabilities of all types Support of present and future nonproliferation regimes The defense and security team had input from DOE OS and NNSA laboratories, NASA, Navy, Army, Air Force, DTRA, NATO, DHS, academia, and industry Accelerator technologies find applications for a diverse and growing set of security and defense needs February 13, 2012 Defense and Security: US DOE Accelerator R&D Task Force 19

What did the Accelerators for Americas Future report say about industry? Wide variety of accelerators are enabling technology in many applications Electrons: From surface treatment, packaging products, auto parts to sterilization of medical supplies and food irradiation Ions: Extensive use in semiconductor industry in chip manufacturing and in hardening surfaces on materials used in artificial joints Industrial accelerators primarily developed by private sector Two factors retarding improvements of accelerators in US industry Technology: Need for more DOE technical exchanges, workshops and interactions with industry to jointly develop equipment (Accelerator producers) Business: Users hesitant to switch from existing processes to acceleratorbased technologies, so need a demonstration site to assess changes (Accelerator users) A number of mature applications need improvements to be competitive February 13, 2012 Industry: US DOE Accelerator R&D Task Force 20 Economic impact of

accelerator technology developments Business application Cancer therapy Radioisotope production Ion implantation Neutron generators MRI systems Medical imaging detectors Ion beam analysis Hi-energy X-ray inspection Recent US accelerator start-up companies 10 companies $310M revenue 1400 employees Need more than 30 accelerator scientists 15 US companies $5.3B annual revenue 9200 employees The development of accelerators spurs economic development February 13, 2012

Industry: US DOE Accelerator R&D Task Force 21 S y s te m s b u ilt to d a te Industrial accelerator business 11000 Total built to date >24 000, with >18 000 in operation 10200 10000 Sales increasing ~10% per year 9000 8000 7000

7000 Presently >70 accelerator vendors worldwide 6000 5000 4000 2600 3000 2000 1500 1000 1500 1000 250 0 70

Vendors primarily in US, Europe and Japan, but growing in China, Russia and India Equipment sales ~$3B per year worldwide All the products that are processed, treated or inspected by particle beams have an annual value exceeding $500B February 13, 2012 Industry: US DOE Accelerator R&D Task Force 22 What did the Accelerators for Americas Future report say about medical applications? Accelerator-based synchrotron light and neutron sources play an important role in development of advanced pharmaceuticals

Electron linear accelerators are used extensively for x-ray therapy, for which there is a large commercial market Use of proton (including some carbon) machines for cancer therapy is growing worldwide Most are developed and deployed by industry No carbon-based machines in the US Tens of millions of patients receive accelerator-based diagnoses and treatments each year 50 medical isotopes are routinely produced with accelerators February 13, 2012 Medicine: US DOE Accelerator R&D Task Force 23 What did the Accelerators for Americas Future report say about medical applications? Radioisotope production

Two major issues Uncertainties in continuous access to specific radioisotopes for medical research Tenuous supply chain for clinically relevant fission-produced radioisotopes such as 99Mo/99mTc Beam therapy There is a need for substantial improvement in technology, as well as in understanding of the underlying biology and clinical factors There is potential gain from carbon ion beams Higher biological effectiveness Superior dose distribution February 13, 2012 Medicine: US DOE Accelerator R&D Task Force 24 What did the Accelerators for Americas Future report say about energy? Accelerators play a pivotal role in the nations energy future by providing essential tools for materials characterization using photons and neutrons at the BES user facilities Accelerators have the potential to make a big impact in the

deployment of advanced nuclear energy systems Accelerator Driven Subcritical Reactors can open up new possibilities for advanced nuclear fuel cycles Accelerator-based materials irradiation facilities are needed to provide environments relevant for advanced nuclear energy systems for fusion and fission Inertial confinement fusion based on heavy-ion bombardment of deuterium/tritium nuclear fuel for electricity production There is tremendous potential, largely untapped thus far, to deploy accelerator technology for the nations energy problems February 13, 2012 Energy: US DOE Accelerator R&D Task Force 25 What did the Accelerators for Americas Future report say about the environment? Electron particle beam technology effectiveness has been demonstrated for:: Gas emissions treatment, primarily removal of sulphur and nitrogen oxides in flue gas Water treatment, including drinking water, waste water, and ultrapure water for industrial applications Solid waste treatment, especially in the remediation of soils and for sewage sludge

Potential for applications in: Removal of volatile organic compounds and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, products of waste incineration Removal of pharmaceuticals from water supply Mercury removal from coal-fired boilers Greatest advantage: High efficiency , measured to be >80% measured, which could lead to less power consumption (the water sector currently uses ~20% of all electricity in US) Accelerators have the potential to be effective, efficient tools for cleaning the environment February 13, 2012 Environment: US DOE Accelerator R&D Task Force 26 Results from Accelerators for Americas Future Workshop May 10, 2012 Overview: US DOE Accelerator R&D Task Force

Courtesy: W. Henning, C. Shan 27 How Does Basic Accelerator R&D Connect to Societal Benefits? May 10, 2012 Overview: US DOE Accelerator R&D Task Force 28 How DOE thinks about Accelerator R&D May 10, 2012 Overview: US DOE Accelerator R&D Task Force 29 How Accelerator Physicists Think About R&D: The Grand Challenges 1.

2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. Extend the energy reach of collider technology to probe fundamental phenomena at the multi-TeV scale High Energy Extend the beam power and intensity reach of hadron accelerator technology to enable next-generation capabilities in fundamental physical sciences and applications in energy Beam power Extend the capability and understanding of performance limits of RF accelerating structures and technology High Gradient Break the RF Barrier by developing scalable next-generation acceleration methods in the 10 GeV/meter range New Acceleration Methods Develop tools and technologies for the manipulation of particle beam phasespace and the exploration of limitations to beam emittance Beam Emittance Develop concepts and technologies to extend the brightness, brilliance and coherence of photon sources to meet the challenges of 21st century materials science Brightness & Coherence Develop accelerator systems to serve as compact sources of photons, neutrons, protons and ions Compact Accelerators Accelerator R&D has grand challenges driven primarily by discovery

sciences Overview: US DOE Accelerator R&D Task May 10, 2012 30 but with applications in many fields Force How Congress Thinks about Accelerators Discovery Science Medicine and Biology Energy and Environment Accelerators and Beams National Security Industry 31 Connecting the dots: From Science to Application

May 10, 2012 Feedback Overview: US DOE Accelerator R&D Task Force 32 Previously successful R&D VARIAN May 10, 2012 Overview: US DOE Accelerator R&D Task Force 33 What Stands in the Way of LabIndustry Cooperation? May 10, 2012 Overview: US DOE Accelerator R&D Task Force

34 Historically, this is how the labs have viewed industry May 10, 2012 Overview: US DOE Accelerator R&D Task Force Courtesy: Eric Isaacs 35 and this is how industry has viewed us. May 10, 2012 Overview: US DOE Accelerator R&D Task Force Courtesy: Eric Isaacs 36

Specific Task Force Suggestions May 10, 2012 Overview: US DOE Accelerator R&D Task Force 37 Encourage stakeholder engagement: The Round Table The Office of High Energy Physics (OHEP), being the historical steward of long-term accelerator and accelerator-related research and development, could consider leading an accelerator and/or peripheral working group, an oversight panel, a steering group or a Board of Stakeholders. This would involve intra-agency and interagency program managers as well as industry representatives and technical advisors in the area of accelerators May 10, 2012 Overview: US DOE Accelerator R&D Task Force

38 Engage partners by communicating capabilities and streamlining access National laboratories, user facilities and other accelerator R&D facilities of the Office of Science would all benefit from more direct and open communication. This would include the development of simple user-friendly procedures to give customers (for example, other agencies and industry) access to national laboratory infrastructure (computing centers, test facilities, test stations and technology infrastructure) and, equally importantly, to expertise (people and results). This could include the provision to perform proprietary research, or at least research in access-controlled areas. In many cases the use of this infrastructure could be modeled after well-established principles from BES user facilities and represented by the National User Facility Organization (http://nufo.org/). May 10, 2012 Overview: US DOE Accelerator R&D Task Force 39 Streamline processes to encourage partnerships with

Industry The Office of Science/OHEP can work to identify, understand and resolve the concerns from industry and other agencies regarding protection of incoming and generated intellectual property or information. It would be useful to have, for this purpose and as a basis, a template applicable to all user facilities and infrastructure at Office of Science national laboratories. Such templates could cover all aspects of a contractual arrangement that is typically negotiated every time an arrangement is put in place. May 10, 2012 Overview: US DOE Accelerator R&D Task Force 40 Leverage the SBIR/STTR Programs Leveraging the SBIR/STTR funding with a specific focus on energy and environment, medicine, industry and defense and security

apart from discovery science could strengthen these parts of the program, providing an easy way to direct some money towards the topic areas identified in the Accelerators for Americas Future workshop. May 10, 2012 Overview: US DOE Accelerator R&D Task Force 41 Focus efforts by forming interdisciplinary teams to solve problems: Collaborative Accelerator Research Teams The Office of Science OHEPs wealth of knowledge and vast infrastructure could be channeled to establish Collaborative Accelerator Research Teams (CARTs) focused on specific challenges detailed in the Accelerators for Americas Future workshop. OHEP, with its stewardship program as well as the other directorates through its national laboratories, could direct its capabilities towards specific issues in the areas of energy and the environment, medicine, industry, defense and security and discovery science. The interdisciplinary Teams, drawing from national laboratories, other agencies, industry and universities,

would have a clear mission, a finite duration and are competitively bid. Overview: US DOE Accelerator R&D Task May 10, 2012 42 Force Establish a Program in Applied Accelerator Technology The Office of Science could establish a program with the purpose of bringing industry, laboratories and universities together to foster the application of energy and the environment, accelerator technology in industry, medicine, defense and security and discovery science. May 10, 2012 Overview: US DOE Accelerator R&D Task

Force 43 Ensure the accelerator workforce of tomorrow by expanding educational programs The particle accelerator workforce would significantly benefit from an extension and addition to what is currently available in education programs. Workforce development for particle accelerator R&D has traditionally been a major emphasis of in the HEP and theparticular, Office of Science, and some of the NSF programs. Though close contacts between universities and national laboratories exist, the Office of Science could help involve more universities in accelerator education programs. It could also facilitate more integration with industry, giving it easier access to these programs. Copyright W.A. Barletta

May 10, 2012 Overview: US DOE Accelerator R&D Task Force 44 Infrastructure Proposal 1 Scripps Proton Therapy Center, San Diego; Courtesy: VARIAN Medical Systems confidential The medical community would benefit from a discussion of how the current R&D program could help on the route to a National Resources for Hadron Beam Medical Facilities. The Office of Science could develop a stepwise implementation plan for providing beams, developing beams and beam delivery systems for a costefficient production of such facility. May 10, 2012 Overview: US DOE Accelerator R&D Task Force 45

Infrastructure Proposal 2 The Office of Science could consider providing a home for laser R&D under its auspices. Lasers, an enabling technology, have become an integral part of accelerators and provide tremendous potential for new methods of acceleration, for miniaturization of accelerators and as part of accelerator systems. May 10, 2012 Overview: US DOE Accelerator R&D Task Force 46 What does this mean for Fermilab? We are in exactly the right place at the right time The Illinois Accelerator Research Center mission is exactly to meet the need identified in the Senate language:

the divide that exists in translating breakthroughs in accelerator science and technology into applications that benefit the marketplace and American competitiveness May 10, 2012 Overview: US DOE Accelerator R&D Task Force 47 Summary This is a new way of thinking and represents a real opportunity Implementing some of the ideas would mean doing business a bit differently We hope that our input will last longer and go deeper than some of the other panels. But that

needs Office of Science on board May 10, 2012 Overview: US DOE Accelerator R&D Task Force 48 Backup May 10, 2012 Overview: US DOE Accelerator R&D Task Force 49 Courtesy: R. Hamm More recent Technology Transfer Companies New technology transfer companies Application area

Accuray Medical Industrial & discovery Niowave. science Industrial & discovery Radiabeam science Lyncean Technologies Medical Mevion Medical CPAC Medical XScell (formerly SRC) Industrial Adelphi Technology, Inc. Industrial AccSys Technology, Inc. Medical & industrial Total May 10, 2012 Overview: US DOE Accelerator R&D Task Force

Annual Employees Revenue 1100 $285M 1385 ~$310M 50 Executive Committee in the Defense World May 10, 2012 Overview: US DOE Accelerator R&D Task Force 51 What do we have so far: I will go over a couple of major ideas that a more general and address questions of impediments to success and

major programs to look for. We have had teams working on: Discovery Science: G. Hoffstaetter, M. White Energy/Environment: S. Henderson, F.Pilat Medicine: L. Boeh, J. Clayton, S. Gourlay, G. Zdasiuk Defense: S. Biedron, S. Milton Industry: R. Hamm, L. Merminga, S. Ozaki, May 10, 2012 Overview: US DOE Accelerator R&D Task Force 52 Anyone seen the lifejackets? May 10, 2012 Overview: US DOE Accelerator R&D Task Force 53 Outline Some History Previous Accelerator R&D Panels (Tigner, Marx 1, Marx 2)

Accelerators for Americas Future Applications of Accelerators Senate Language Task Force membership, history and operations Accelerator Business Why do we do accelerator R&D and how does it connect to applications? The opportunities Barriers Concrete suggestions May 10, 2012 Overview: US DOE Accelerator R&D Task Force 54 Accelerators in the market place

Courtesy: R. Hamm Accelerator business segment US Vendors Electron cancer therapy Varian Medical Corporation Radioisotope production GE Medical (Sweden) Ion implantation Applied Materials Corp. Annual Revenue* No. of US Foreign owned vendors Employees* in US

$2,340M 5200 $120M 100 $1,200M 1500 $25M 150 MRI systems Thermo Scientific, Adelphi Technology, Inc. Fonar Corporation, GE Healthcare $1,500M 2000

Medical imaging detectors Ortec, Amptek, Canberra n/a n/a Ion Beam Analysis National Electrostatic Corporation $20M 100 Electron beam NDE Varian Security & Inspection Products, L&W Research Corp., HESCO $110M

150 $5.315B 9200 Neutron generators * Estimates from author May 10, 2012 Overview: US DOE Accelerator R&D Task Force Siemens Healthcare, AccSys Technology, Inc. 55 What did the Accelerators for Americas Future report say Accelerators open up

newabout energy? possibilities for advanced nuclear fuel cycles Back end: transmutation of waste Front end: power generation using Th fuel, or breeding fissile material for subsequent use in critical or subcritical reactor Accelerator-based irradiation facilities to provide environments systems relevant for advanced nuclear energy systems for fusion and fission Fast neutron spectrum, up to 100 dpa, high temp. and relevant He concentration Heavy-ion fusion Use ion beams to heat deuterium/tritium fuel to ignition in an inertial Energy: US DOE Accelerator R&D Task February 13, 2012 power reactor 56

fusion Force Courtesy: M. Procario; from a recent briefing to Bill Brinkman Accelerator R&D Inventory SC Program Participation by labs and thrusts Thrust Beam Inst. Physics Beam New NC high Particle Instr/ctl concept grad. RF sources ANL BNL

FNAL JLAB LBNL PPPL SLAC RF sources SC

magnet SC RF

UNIV.

Key: 100<<300; 300<<1,000; >1,000 (FY11 $k) Color code: ASCR; BES ; HEP ; NP May 10, 2012 Overview: US DOE Accelerator R&D Task Force 57 1994: First J. Marx Panel Director, DOE Office of Energy Research (OER) requested a broad assessment of the current status and promise of the field of accelerator physics and technology with respect to the five OER programs HEPAP established a subpanel with representation from each area (NEP, NP, BES, FES, HER) drawn from accelerator community and those disciplines associated with the Scientific program Subpanel asked to provide recommendations and guidance on appropriate future R&D needs, management issues and funding requirements

May 10, 2012 Overview: US DOE Accelerator R&D Task Force 58 1994 J. Marx Panel: Exec Summary This subpanel believes that DOEhave de facto held a national trust for the stewardship of accelerator science and technology development. This has provided the foundation for essential capabilities needed both for the DOE mission and for addressing broader national interests Stewardship of accelerator science and technology should be acknowledged as an explicit part of the overall DOE Energy Research mission Appropriate investment in basic accelerator science and related technology R&D Support of the training of the accelerator scientists and engineers Each program should have proposal-driven, peer reviewed long-term accelerator R&D as part of its portfolio OER advisory committees should be charged with recommending the level of long-term accelerator R&D funding for each program OER program officers and laboratory managers who are responsible for stewardship of accelerator science and technology should make a special effort to nurture societal applications

May 10, 2012 Overview: US DOE Accelerator R&D Task Force 59 What did the Accelerators for Americas Future report say about medical applications? Radioisotope production Two major issues Uncertainties in continuous access to specific radioisotopes for medical research Tenuous supply chain for clinically relevant fission-produced radioisotopes such as 99Mo/99mTc Projects and goals PoP demo of increased production of alpha-emitting radioisotopes for therapy New electromagnetic isotope separator facility New, 3040 MeV variable-energy, multi-particle, high-current accelerator facility Initiative to address significant increase in demand as research opportunities

expand into general use Collaborative opportunity for NP and HEP February 13, 2012 Medicine: US DOE Accelerator R&D Task Force 60 What did the Accelerators for Americas Future report say about medical applications? Beam therapy There is a need for substantial improvement in technology, as well as in understanding of the underlying biology and clinical factors There is potential gain from carbon ion beams Higher biological effectiveness Superior dose distribution Project and goals Significant improvement in beam delivery and field-shaping systems Motion correction imaging, dose detection and flexibility of beam delivery

Ability to locate the position of the target in real time requires substantial technical development Reduce size and cost February 13, 2012 Medicine: US DOE Accelerator R&D Task Force 61 What did the Accelerators for Americas Future report say about defense and security? Ten key areas

Physical data measurements High-energy density conditions Directed energy capability Cargo inspection and interrogation Replacement of radioactive sources and materials Isotope production Nuclear forensics Compact, fieldable (rugged) accelerator systems Simulation tools Work force training Laser Target Ion Beam High-intensity Laser Pulse ~ 100 -- 1,000 nm Accelerator laboratories and technologies have the potential to make significant contributions to the needs of defense and security in these areas February 13, 2012

Defense and Security: US DOE Accelerator R&D Task Force 62

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