COCA Call Information - Emergency Preparedness and Response|CDC

COCA Call Information - Emergency Preparedness and Response|CDC

COCA Call Information For the best quality audio, we encourage you to use your computers audio: https://zoom.us/j/303250878 If you cannot join through digital audio, you may join by phone in listen-only mode: +1-646-558-8656 or +1 646 558 8656 Passcode: 3032508#

All questions for the Q&A portion must be submitted through the webinar system. Please select the Q&A button at the bottom of the webinar and enter questions there. The Role of Healthcare Professionals in Protecting Older Adults against Influenza Clinician Outreach and Communication Activity (COCA)

Webinar October 12, 2017 Continuing Education for COCA Calls All continuing education (CME, CNE, CEU, CECH, ACPE, CPH, and AAVSB/RACE) for COCA Calls are issued online through the CDC Training & Continuing Education Online system (http://www.cdc.gov/TCEOnline/) . Those who participated in todays COCA Call and who wish to receive continuing education should complete the online evaluation by September 15, 2017 with the course code WC2286. Those who will

participate in the on demand activity and wish to receive continuing education should complete the online evaluation between August 15, 2017 and August 15, 2019 will use course code WD2286. Continuing education certificates can be printed immediately upon completion of your online evaluation. A cumulative transcript of all CDC/ATSDR CEs obtained through the CDC Training & Continuing Education Online System will be maintained for each user. Accreditation Statements CME: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical

Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention designates this live activity for a maximum of 1.0 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit. Physicians should only claim credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity. CNE: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is accredited as a provider of Continuing Nursing Education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center's Commission on Accreditation. This activity provides 1.0 contact hour. IACET CEU: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is authorized by IACET to offer 1.0 CEU's for this program. CECH: Sponsored by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, a designated provider of continuing education

contact hours (CECH) in health education by the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. This program is designed for Certified Health Education Specialists (CHES) and/or Master Certified Health Education Specialists (MCHES) to receive up to 1.0 total Category I continuing education contact hours. Maximum advanced level continuing education contact hours available are 0. CDC provider number 98614. CPE: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education as a provider of continuing pharmacy education. This program is a designated event for pharmacists to receive 0.1 CEUs in pharmacy education. The Universal Activity Number is 03870000-17-229-L06-P and enduring 0387-0000-17-229-H06-P course category. Course Category: This activity has been

designated as knowledge-based. Once credit is claimed, an unofficial statement of credit is immediately available on Accreditation Statements continued AAVSB/RACE: This program was reviewed and approved by the AAVSB RACE program for 1.0 hours of continuing education in jurisdictions which recognize AAVSB RACE approval. Please contact the AAVSB RACE program at [email protected] if you have any comments/concerns regarding this programs validity or relevancy to the veterinary profession."

CPH: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is a pre-approved provider of Certified in Public Health (CPH) recertification credits and is authorized to offer 1 CPH recertification credits for this program. CDC is an approved provider of CPH Recertification Credits by the National Board of Public Health Examiners. Effective October 1, 2013, the National Board of Public Health Examiners (NBPHE) accepts continuing education units (CEU) for CPH recertification credits from CDC. Please select CEU as your choice for continuing education when registering for a course on TCEOnline. Learners seeking CPH should use the guidelines provided by the NBPHE for calculating recertification credits. For assistance please contact NBPHE at http://www.NBPHE.org. Continuing Education Disclaimer CDC, our planners, presenters, and their spouses/partners wish to disclose they have no financial interests or other

relationships with the manufacturers of commercial products, suppliers of commercial services, or commercial supporters. Planners have reviewed content to ensure there is no bias. To Ask a Question

Using the Webinar System Click the Q&A button in the webinar Type your question in the Q&A box Submit your question For media questions, please contact CDC Media Relations at 404-639-3286 or send an email to [email protected] If you are a patient, please refer your questions to your healthcare provider. At the end of this COCA Call, the participants will be able to: Describe the phenomenon of immunosenescence and how the immune

system grows weaker with aging. Discuss the importance of safe and effective influenza vaccines specifically developed for adults age 65 years and older. Describe resources available to help healthcare professionals talk with adult patients about specific influenza vaccines most beneficial for them. 8 Todays First Presenter Lisa Grohskopf, MD MPH

Medical Officer National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Todays Second Presenter William Schaffner, MD Medical Director National Foundation for Infectious Diseases Professor of Preventive Medicine and Infectious Diseases Vanderbilt University School of Medicine

National Center for Immunization & Respiratory Diseases 2016-17 U.S. Influenza Season Summary Lisa Grohskopf Influenza Division, CDC Clinician Outreach and Communication Activity October 12, 2017 Summary of 2016-17 Season Peak activity occurred nationally in mid-February but there were regional differences. Western Regions peaked in late December through mid-January

Remainder of country peaked in mid to late February Influenza A(H3N2) viruses predominated overall Influenza B viruses were reported more frequently than influenza A viruses from late March until early July. The majority of circulating viruses were similar to those contained in the 2016-17 vaccine. Activity was moderate with severity indicators within range of what has been observed during previous influenza A (H3N2) predominant seasons. Current Influenza Activity As of Week 39 (the week ending September 30, 2017)

Low activity thus far in the United States Influenza Positive Tests Reported to CDC by U.S. Clinical Laboratories, National Summary, 2016 2017 Season Influenza Positive Tests Reported to CDC by U.S. Public Health Laboratories, National Summary, 2016 2017 Season Pneumonia and Influenza Mortality from the National Center for Health Statistics Mortality Surveillance System Data through the week ending September 16, 2017, as of October 5, 2017 Epidemic Threshold

Seasonal Baseline 201 2 201 3 201 4 201 5

201 6 201 7 Number of Influenza-Associated Pediatric Deaths by Week of Death: 2013-2014 season to present 2013-2014 2014-2015 2015-2016

2016-2017 Number of Deaths Reported = 111 Number of Deaths Reported = 148 Number of Deaths Reported = 92 Number of Deaths Reported = 107

Deaths Reported Previous Week Deaths Reported Current Week Percentage of Visits for Influenza-like Illness (ILI) Reported by the U.S. Outpatient Influenza-like Illness Surveillance Network (ILINet), Weekly National Summary, 2016-2017 and Selected Previous Seasons Laboratory-Confirmed Influenza-Associated Hospitalizations, Cumulative, 2016-2017, by Age Group Source: FluView Interactive

Acknowledgements CDC Influenza Division Surveillance Team: Lenee Blanton Lynnette Brammer Alicia Budd Krista Kniss Natalie Kramer Desiree Mustaquim Noreen Alabi Calli Taylor The Role of Healthcare Professionals in Protecting Older Adults against Influenza

COCA Call Thursday, October 12, 2017 2:00 PM ET Agenda Agenda Snapshot: Burden of Influenza in the 65+ Population Importance of a Strong Healthcare Professional (HCP) Recommendation Care For Older Adults? Care About Flu! Toolkit Overview

Speaker William Schaffner, MD NFID Medical Director Professor of Preventive Medicine and Infectious Diseases Vanderbilt University School of Medicine Nashville, TN Learning Objectives At the conclusion of this activity, participants will be able to:

Describe the phenomenon of immunosenescence and how the immune system grows weaker with aging Discuss the importance of safe and effective influenza vaccines specifically developed for adults age 65 years and older Describe resources available to help healthcare professionals talk with adult patients about specific influenza vaccines most beneficial for them About NFID Non-profit 501(c)(3) organization dedicated to educating the public and healthcare professionals about causes,

prevention, and treatment of infectious diseases across the lifespan Reaches consumers, healthcare professionals, and media through: Coalition-building activities Public outreach initiatives Professional educational programs (ACCME accredited with commendation)

Scientific meetings, research, and training Longstanding partnerships to facilitate rapid program initiation and increase programming impact

Flexible and nimble Snapshot: Burden of Influenza in the 65+ Population Burden of Influenza in the Adult 65+ Population Disproportionate impact on adults age 65+ Immunosenescence Specifically-designed vaccines for adults age 65+ Who Needs Influenza

Vaccination? Age 65 years and older Chronic illness Immunocompromised No excuse to miss this vaccine Pregnancy

and its protective Prior splenectomy value Healthcare professionals at near zero risk! Young children IMPACT: Influenza is Seasonal but Not Predictable Percentage of visits for influenza-like Illness (ILI) reported to Keyall Messages: CDC ILINet for selected previous seasons from

US 1. Timing of states CDC FluView Interactive. gis.cdc.gov/GRASP/FluView. influenza illness in your community varies from season to season 2. Influenza varies in severity

from season to season 3. Influenzarelated illness affects all age groups but age 65+ have greatest morbidity and mortality Influenza-Associated Deaths in Adults 65+ Older adults (age 65+) account for up to 85% of all flu-related deaths in the US

Influenza-related all-cause death rate in adults age 65 years and older is 133 per 100,000 people, more than six times the rate of 20 per 100,000 across all ages Findings are consistent with estimates from other countries, where mortality rates are 7 to 11 times higher in those age 65 years and older than the general population NFID Call to Action: Reinvigorating Influenza Prevention in US Adults Age 65 Years and Older. www.nfid.org/flu-older-adults Immunosenescence The gradual deterioration of the immune system due to aging (immunosenescence) results in an

elevated risk of complications from flu in adults age 65 years and older The weakening immune system makes it harder for our bodies to combat disease and may decrease the immune response to standard influenza vaccines Chronic Diseases Increase Risk of Flu-Related Complications Immunosuppressive drugs used to treat chronic conditions, like rheumatoid arthritis, decrease a patients ability to

prevent or fight off infections, making them more susceptible to illnesses such as flu CDC places individuals with key medical conditions in a highrisk category, including: Asthma Chronic lung disease Heart disease Diabetes And more Older adults also are more likely to have chronic medical conditions Specifically-Designed

Vaccines for Adults 65+ Adjuvanted Vaccine (Seqirus) High-Dose Vaccine (Sanofi Pasteur) ACIP Recommendations for Adults 65+ Adults age 65 years and older may receive any age-appropriate IIV (standard- or high-dose, trivalent or quadrivalent, adjuvanted or unadjuvanted) or RIV Vaccination should not be delayed to find a

particular product if an appropriate one is available Prevention and Control of Seasonal Influenza with Vaccines: Recom mendations of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices United States, 201718 Influenza Season Importance of HCP Recommendation Importance of HCP Vaccine Recommendation More than half of adults age 65+ were more likely

to get a flu shot if recommended by their doctor1 HCPs must take advantage of every opportunity to provide optimal protection for adults age 65+ and continue to work collaboratively to remove any ongoing barriers to vaccination2 www.ncoa.org/healthy-aging/flu-you/resources/# survey 1 2 NFID Call to Action: Reinvigorating Influenza Prevention in US

Specialist Visits as Opportunities for Vaccine Discussion Outpatient visits to specialists present an excellent, but often missed, opportunity to provide vaccine if the office stocks it or recommends that patients receive it Providing patients with take-home information or a prescription for influenza vaccine can encourage them to follow through with vaccination more than a recommendation alone Practicing specialists and office staff should also be immunized to protect themselves and patients against flu

Conclusions Influenza is a key contributor to morbidity and mortality in older adults They have the highest rate of influenza-associated deaths and hospitalizations of any defined high-risk group The majority of influenza-associated deaths during most seasonal epidemics occur in adults 65+ Even if they recover, older adults may never fully regain their pre-influenza health and abilities, significantly impacting their lifestyle Older adults with chronic conditions are at even higher risk for flu-related hospitalizations, complications, and death HCPs strongly insist that patients 65+ receive annual

influenza vaccination Care For Older Adults? Care About Flu! Toolkit Overview Public Service Announcement Resources

Infographic Fact Sheet Poster/Handout Email Template On-Hold Scripts www.nfid.org/flu65 Toolkit available at: www.nfid.org/flu65 To Ask a Question

Using the Webinar System Click the Q&A button in the webinar Type your question in the Q&A box Submit your question CDC Media: [email protected] or 404-639-3286 Patients, please refer your questions to your healthcare provider Todays webinar will be archived When: A few days after the live call What: All call recordings (audio, webinar, and transcript) Where: On the COCA Call webpage

https:// emergency.cdc.gov/coca/calls/2017/callin fo_101217.asp 4 4 Continuing Education for COCA Calls All continuing education (CME, CNE, CEU, CECH, ACPE, CPH, and AAVSB/RACE) for COCA Calls are issued online through the CDC Training & Continuing Education Online system (htt p://www.cdc.gov/TCEOnline/) .

Those who participated in todays COCA Call and who wish to receive continuing education should complete the online evaluation by September 15, 2017 with the course code WC2286. Those who will participate in the on demand activity and wish to receive continuing education should complete the online evaluation between October 12, 2017 and October 12, 2019 will use course code WD2286. Continuing education certificates can be printed immediately upon completion of your online evaluation. A cumulative transcript of all CDC/ATSDR CEs obtained through the CDC Training & Continuing Education Online System will be maintained for each user.

Upcoming COCA Call The Role of Primary Care Providers in Supporting Children, Families, and Themselves Following Hurricanes Harvey, Irma, and Maria Thursday, October 26, 2017 Join the COCA Mailing List Receive information about: Upcoming COCA Calls Health Alert Network notices

CDC public health activations Emerging health threats Emergency preparedness and response conferences and training opportunities http://emergency.cdc.gov/coca COCA Products & Services Promotes COCA Calls and contains all information subscribers need to participate in COCA Calls. COCA Calls

are done as needed. Monthly email that provides information on CDC training opportunities, conference and training resources located on the COCA website, the COCA Partner Spotlight, and the Clinician Corner. Provides comprehensive CDC guidance so clinicians can easily follow recommendations. COCA Products & Services Monthly email that provides new

CDC & COCA resources for clinicians from the past month and additional information important during public health emergencies and disasters. Informs clinicians of new CDC resources and guidance related to emergency preparedness and response. This email is sent as soon as possible after CDC publishes new content. CDC's primary method of sharing cleared information about urgent public health incidents with public

information officers; federal, state, territorial, and local public health practitioners; clinicians; and public health laboratories. Thank you for joining! Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Atlanta, Georgia http://emergency.cdc.gov/coca

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