Administrative Practices - Business Studies at Campbeltown ...

Administrative Practices - Business Studies at Campbeltown ...

Administrative Practices National 4/5 and Higher Administration & IT What you will learn Tasks, skills and qualities of an Administrative and Senior Admin Assistant (P14 ) Customer Care Health & Safety

Security of people, property and information Organising and supporting events Tasks, skills and qualities of an administrative assistant What will I learn? The tasks undertaken by an admin assistant. The skills and qualities required/possessed by an admin assistant. What is Administration? Administration helps any organisation run efficiently and in an organised way.

An admin assistant will be required to fulfil a range of general administrative duties The range of tasks will depend on the size and type of organisation. What duties might an Admin Assistant carry out? The role of an Administration Assistant Word processing business documents

Using the Internet and emerging technologies, e.g. blogs and podcasts Using databases and spreadsheets to store information The Admin Assistant Sending and receiving e-mails and making diary

appointments Using the photocopier and fax machine Using technology to prepare and communicate information Organising events Answering the telephone and working in reception Skills and Qualities A skill is the ability to do something well, either through practising it or by gaining knowledge in the skill eg:

IT skills. Customer care or customer service Literacy Numeracy Communication Problem solving etc. A quality describes the type of person the job applicant is, for example: if if if if they they they they

are organised can use their own initiative are dependable and reliable are patient, calm and tactful Finding the right person for the job When an organisation is looking to appoint a new member of staff, they will draw up a job description and a person specification. Job Description A document that gives details relating to a specific job Background to post Duties and tasks

Responsibilities Line Manager Hours Salary Holiday entitlement Sickness and benefit entitlement A job applicant uses this document to decide if the job is right for them. Person Specification From the job description, the organisation can prepare a person specification document.

Highlights the skills, qualifications, experience and personal qualities required from a suitable candidate. Each component of the person specification is usually classed as essential* or desirable. Thus, a profile of the ideal candidate can be prepared and used to assist in the selection process. A job applicant uses this document to decide if they have the necessary skills, qualifications, experience and personal qualities to be able to apply for the job. Person specification Admin Assistant Admin assistant person specification

Essential Skills, knowledge and abilities Qualifications Ability to accurately key in data. Ability to create and edit wordprocessed documents.

Ability to create and edit spreadsheets. Confident at using e-mail and the Internet. Ability to file accurately. Ability to organise small-scale events. National 4/5 Administration and IT Experience Personal qualities Desirable Ability to quickly follow verbal and

written instructions. Motivated and keen to learn. Can use their own initiative or work as part of a team. Dependable/reliable. Ability to create and edit databases. Knowledge of prioritising workloads in order to meet deadlines. Ability to learn new ICT skills quickly. National 5 English and Maths Previous administrative experience at a junior level.

Organised. Good at time management. Applying for the Job Once a job applicant has decided that the job would suit them (based on the information provided in the job description) and that they have the necessary skills, experience and qualities (as identified in the person specification), they should apply for the job. This can be done in one of two ways: completing an application form drawing up a curriculum vitae (CV) Applying for the job

Application forms allow job applicants to provide information in a standardised format. Job applicants complete this, giving full information about themselves, outlining their knowledge, skills and experience that are specifically identified in the job description and person specification. A CV allows a job applicant to provide information about themselves in a format that they have created. Each job applicants CV may contain different information. Applying for the job The Human Resources department can then match each completed application form or CV with the job description and person specification to check the job applicants suitability

for the job. This will allow the organisation to draw up a short-list of suitable applicants for the job. These applicants will then be invited to attend for an interview where the selection of the best person for the job will be made and a job offer made. Job applicants may be asked to enclose a reference (written statement from a referee) about their suitability for the job, or this may be followed-up later. The successful job applicant will be issued with a contract of employment (giving details of the job title, salary and working conditions) before they have started work.

Identifying current skills and gaps in skills Most people find it difficult to assess their own skills and qualities. However, it is an important task that will highlight any areas you need to gain knowledge or experience in. Staff development is vital to ensure that you are doing your job to the best of your ability. Training and development will also help further your career and may lead to a promotion in your organisation. Skills Scan

A skill scan is a statement describing an individuals skills, knowledge and qualities to date. For example, consider the following skills. For each, a rating of 14 is used where 1 indicates that the individual is very good at this skill and 4 indicates that the individual has no knowledge or experience of this skill. Having completed a skill scan, the individual will be able to analyse their own level of skill and knowledge. Columns 3 and 4 will highlight areas in which the individual needs further training and development. Your teacher will give you a Skill Scan for you to complete

Skills Scan Very good 1 Ability to prioritise workloads in order to meet deadlines Excellent verbal and written communication skills Excellent organisation and communication skills Awareness of health and safety issues Ability to deal with ICT equipment effectively Confident at using e-mail and the Internet Ability to use initiative and work unsupervised Ability to work as part of a team Ability to organise small-scale events

No knowledge 2 3 4 SWOT Analysis An alternative approach to a skill scan may be to prepare a SWOT analysis where an individual identifies their areas of strengths and weaknesses plus any opportunities and threats that are faced. Skills, knowledge and qualities that require improvement

will be highlighted under weaknesses and threats. SWOT Analysis - - - Strengths What positive characteristics does the individual have? What is the individual good at? Do other people compliment the individual on certain skills or qualities? -

Opportunities What are the promising prospects facing the individual? Is the individual doing all that they can to ensure success in their studies and secure a job in the future? What more could they be doing? - - - Weaknesses Are there things that the individual does badly? What skills and abilities need improvement?

Threats How are things likely to change in the future, especially with regard to IT? Will the individual be able to adapt? Are there any obstacles that could threaten their success on this course? Create your own SWOT analysis! Some useful links? http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D1KiaY6t vG0 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O4TgWG remLI http:// www.youtube.com/watch?v=NGmxgQzwZ-8 &feature=related http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3J8gRTck ZPI

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CDkPSaV 0sM4 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EX7AOqk P59M A day without an Admin Assistant Watch the video below. Identify the jobs that would normally be done by Suzanne the Admin Assistant. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3x A9qhwrZPo Use local/national newspapers or the Internet to carry out research on three current vacancies available for admin assistants. Write the answers in your jotter. Using the information available identify the:

current salary location working hours tasks/duties qualities and skills required www.s1jobs.com Tasks, skills and qualities of an administrative assistant Got it? I understand the tasks/duties of an Admin assistant. I understand what a job description is and why it is used. I understand the skills required of an Admin assistant.

I understand the qualities required of an Admin assistant. I understand what a person specification is and why it is used. I understand what a skill scan and SWOT analysis is and why it is used. Customer care Customer care What will I learn? The key features of good customer service.

The benefits of good customer service. The impact of poor customer service. Who are an organisations customers? Customers can be both internal and external A good admin assistant must know how to behave in relation to other employees

within the organisation internal customers as well as people who buy the organisations products and services external customers. Customer Care Customer care is sometimes seen to be more important for some employees than others, but it is equally important. Eg: A receptionist or any employee who deals directly with external customers should have customer care as a key consideration in their job description and training. An admin assistant responsible for processing business documents may have little direct contact with customers, but customer satisfaction will be low if the documents contain errors.

Customer Care Policy A Customer Care Policy - customer service policy is a written statement of the organisations policy and their plans for dealing with their customers. An organisation must aim to keep customers satisfied and ensure that all customers are treated in a consistent, fair way. This document is produced to ensure that customers get: the product/service they want the standard they want a price that is acceptable Customer Care policy A customer service policy will document the organisations policy and how they will deal with the following aspects of customer care.

Communicating with customers Email, return calls, website, social media etc Ensuring the quality of customer care Training, awareness of customer care policy, etc Monitoring that customer needs are satisfied Customer survey/questionnaires, focus groups, mystery shoppers Dealing with customer complaints. Agreed procedure for handling, use to learn and improve

service Customer Service Experiences In pairs, discuss your experiences of customer service both good and bad Summarise the story into your jotter. What would you do differently? Mission statement Most organisations have a short mission statement, which gives an outline of the main intentions of the organisation. It can be a mix between a slogan and a summary of the organisations aims. It is used to tell external customers about the organisation and its ideals. It is also used to give employees an idea/ vision of what the organisation hopes to achieve and helps them to focus their

work towards achieving this goal. Mission Statements Examples eBays mission statement is to provide a global trading platform where practically anyone can trade practically anything. Apple To produce high quality, low cost, easy to use products that incorporate high technology for the individual. We are

proving that high technology does not have to be intimidating for non-computer experts. Arnold Clark: To offer genuine value for money and create high levels of customer satisfaction. Walt Disney: To make people happy. To be the worlds number one airline. These are the 'one-liners', but each is supported by a set of values that set the performance standards and direct the implementation of the mission. Walt Disney states some of their values as follows. Creativity, dreams and imagination. The key features of good customer service are: putting the customer first communicating with customers effectively ensuring that staff are knowledgeable about products/services

providing a good after sales service dealing with complaints effectively The benefits of good customer service Satisfied customers Keeping loyal customers If customers are happy with the products/services being provided they will return and recommend the organisation to others. This can be done by offering customers loyalty schemes, such as the Boots Advantage Card, Nectar points, etc. Attracting new customers

This might be as a result of a recommendation from an existing customer or persuasion through loyalty schemes/advertising. Satisfied and motivated employees A clear customer care strategy allows employees to deal with all customers effectively, reducing stress. Lower staff turnover Employees are not stressed and will stay with the organisation. Reduced costs The cost of recruiting new employees is not necessary. Good/improved reputation Recommendations from existing customers will improve the image of the organisation; if a customer has had a good experience with an organisation, they are likely to talk about it. Competitive edge

A good reputation/more effective performance will mean that customers are more likely to choose that organisation rather than a competitor. Increased sales/profits More customers (loyal and new) will mean that the organisation will increase the value of their sales and therefore increase their profit. The impact of poor customer service Dissatisfied customers If customers are unhappy about the products/services being provided, they will not return and will tell others of their dissatisfaction. Loss of customers

Dissatisfied customers will look for products/services elsewhere. Bad publicity Dissatisfied customers will talk! Demotivated employees Employees who do not receive appropriate customer care training, or have not been advised of the organisations customer care strategy, may make mistakes, not deal with customers effectively, and this will lead to stress. High staff turnover Unhappy employees will leave to work elsewhere. Increased costs The costs of recruiting/training new staff will be high. Poor reputation The organisation will gain a poor reputation through bad publicity

and customers/employees talking of their dissatisfaction/demotivation. Poor competitive edge Customers will be more likely to choose a competitor as they are performing more effectively. Decreased sales/profits Fewer customers (the loss of loyal customers and not attracting new customers) will result in lower sales and therefore lower profits. Legal action Employees not complying with consumer legislation may lead to customers taking legal action. MONITORING AND EVALUATING CUSTOMER CARE Mystery

shopper Satisfaction surveys Customer focus group Loyalty cards Market research Quality management systems Describe each of the above. For each one, say if you think they are useful or not Customer Care Watch the video below. Identify as many examples of poor customer care as you can: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v =lmFXThtn014 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v =ZDxIFQLOiV0 (stop this one before end)

Now describe what should have happened! Useful links! http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hRAM5EE 5kgg http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6M0TgEU bRBc http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b1HzoQ WiC0E http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OJVHg_JA GNU http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OrxvmM 5aUzY Spot the difference

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6Zsmtpd 2IcQ v http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lbVLgvE3 kE0 Internal Customers Spot the Difference http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G277C1c k9Hg V http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FkATmsULU -I

Customer Care Got it? I understand what an internal customer is. I understand what an external customer is. I understand what a customer service strategy is. I understand what a mission statement is. I understand why a mission statement is used. I understand the key features of good customer service. I understand the effects of good customer service. I understand the impact of poor customer service. Health and Safety Health and safety Hazards in the workplace and measures taken to ensure safe practice.

The procedure to be followed when an accident occurs (and how to complete the required documentation). What is meant by an organisational health and safety policy and what it includes. The use of induction training to cover health and safety issues. Current UK health and safety legislation and what employers and employees should do in relation to these acts. Identification of hazards and measures to ensure safe practice Accidents can occur within the workplace. It is important that all hazards are minimised in order to reduce the number of accidents that occur.

Major injuries can be caused by: slips or trips (from trailing cables, open filing cabinets, etc) falling (when trying to reach the top of a cupboard or shelf) poor lifting and handling techniques. Notices should also be placed in appropriate areas to remind staff of their health and safety duties. Safety checklist To prevent slips or trips, employees should: position desks to avoid trailing cables or use a cable management system position filing cabinets away from the door never store heavy materials in a hard to reach place (provide a step ladder if required) pick up or mop up any liquids that have been spilled (use a danger sign if the floor is still wet) keep passageways free from obstacles

To prevent fires, employees should: keep liquids away from computer equipment never overload power sockets (reposition furniture or install more power points if required) report any faults immediately empty waste bins regularly smoke only in designated areas never prop open fire doors General H & S Warnings Never attempt to fix equipment unless fully trained to do so. Report loose flooring. Employees should always keep their own work areas tidy. Whats Wrong? Spot the Hazard?

Prevent strain! http:// clewett.net.au/whs/html/lesson_6.html Reporting of Accidents If an accident does occur within the organisation an accident report form and an accident book must be completed. The accident report form may be completed by a witness to the accident or the person involved in the accident. It is very important that the organisation

maintains a record of all accidents if there are too many accidents occurring then the Health and Safety Executive will investigate health and safety practices within the firm. Accident report form Name of injured person Amy Taylor Date of birth 16/9/88 Position in the organisation Finance Manager Date and time of incident 22 June 2013, 11 am

Brief description of accident (continue on separate sheet if required) Tripped over trailing cables Place of accident Reception Details of injury Broken wrist, sprained ankle First aid treatment (if given) Ice pack on wrist and ankle Was the injured person taken

to hospital/doctor Taken to Glasgow General Hospital Accident and Emergency department Name(s) and position(s) of person(s) present when accident occurred Chloe Pearce, Human Resources Manager Signature of person reporting the accident . Date Accident book Date Time Location 12/4/1 3

3.30 pm Sales department 22/6/1 3 11 am Reception Name of Witness injured person Kirstin Dolan Lewis Smith Amy Taylor

Chloe Pearce Details of accident and action taken Fell whilst trying to reach material on high shelf. Head bandaged and taken to hospital. Tripped over trailing cables. Ice pack placed on wrist and ankle. Taken to hospital. The Health and Safety Executive (HSE)

The Health and Safety Executive work with local authorities to check the standards of health, safety and welfare of organisations as well as giving advice on how to prevent people becoming ill because of, or being injured at, work. HSE inspectors can carry out random spot checks on organisations. The following sanctions and penalties can be imposed where health and safety legislation has been breached. An improvement notice may be served this states what the organisation should do to comply with health and safety law, why, and a deadline will be given for compliance. A prohibition notice may be served where premises that are considered to be a serious risk to personal safety may be closed. Prosecution failure to comply with an improvement notice or prohibition order can result in either a fine of 20 000 or up to 6

months imprisonment. Health and safety policy statement A policy statement is a document that explains procedures carried out by an organisation, i.e. how things are done . An organisation that employs five or more people must, by law, have a written health and safety policy. Describing how the organisation will manage health and safety lets staff and others know that the organisation is committed to keeping all staff healthy and safe. The policy should include information such as: the name of the person(s) responsible for carrying out health and safety checks within the organisation and how often this will occur appropriate health and safety training to be given to employees the organisations evacuation procedure how often employees will be consulted on day-to-day health and safety conditions details of the maintenance of equipment

Health and safety policy The Health and Safety at Work Act 1974 states that all employees must have access to the organisations health and safety policy. The policy may be stored on the organisations intranet to ensure ease of access by all employees, this also make the regular updating of the policy easier as organisations must review and revise their policy as often as necessary. Organisations may provide employees with a copy of their health and safety policy during their induction training.

Health and safety procedures will be explained in detail during induction training, and as well as being issued with the organisations health and safety policy, evacuation and first-aid procedures will also be explained. Current legislation The HSE enforces all current health and safety legislation which includes: Health and Safety at Work Act 1974 Health and Safety (Display Screen Equipment) Regulations 1992 Health and Safety (First Aid) Regulations 1981 Fire Precautions (Places of Work) Regulations 1995 Health and Safety at Work Act

1974 Responsibilities of an employee Take reasonable care of their own health and safety and the health and safety of others. Co-operate with the employer on health and safety matters. Do not misuse or interfere with anything provided for employees health and safety. Responsibilities of an organisation Ensure safe methods of working. Ensure safe working conditions.

Ensure all employees receive information and training on health and safety. Ensure that equipment is safe and properly stored. Provide protective clothing where necessary. Health and Safety (Display Screen Equipment) Regulations 1992 This act is designed to minimise the potential risks associated with the use of visual display units (VDUs) including: Eye Strain Headaches

Repetitive strain injury Backache The Health and Safety (Display Screen Equipment) Regulations only apply to employees who use VDUs for a significant partofof working day. Responsibilities antheir employee Responsibilities of an Avoid potential health hazards by: Making use of adjustment facilities for the VDU. Adjusting chair for maximum comfort. Arranging desk and screen to

avoid glare. organisation Assess workstation requirements. Provide adjustable seating. Provide adjustable and tilting screens. Provide health and safety training for employees. Organise daily work of VDU users so that there are regular rest breaks or changes in activity. Health and Safety (Display Screen Equipment) Regulations 1992 Health and Safety (First Aid) Regulations 1981

Organisations are required to: provide a well-stocked first aid box appoint a first aider (it is recommended that there should be one for every 50100 employees) inform staff of first-aid procedures keep a record of all accidents/incidents Fire Precautions (Places of Work) Regulations 1995 Organisations are required to:

assess fire risks in the organisation provide appropriate fire-fighting equipment such as fire extinguishers check and maintain fire-fighting equipment provide warning systems (and check them regularly) train employees in fire procedures regularly check evacuation procedures (regular fire drills would help check routes are appropriate, timings are acceptable, etc.) Watch the videos below. What health and safety hazards can you see? http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=avB8Y-9Bg YE http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Lx3oW9ag etc Health & Safety Got it?

I understand the hazards in the workplace and measures taken to ensure safe practice. I understand the procedure to be followed when an accident occurs and how to complete the required documentation. I understand what is meant by an organisational health and safety policy and what it includes. I understand the use of induction training to cover health and safety issues.

I understand current UK health and safety legislation and what employers and employees should do in relation to these acts. Security of people, property and information Security of people, property and information What will I learn?

Organisational procedures used to protect people. Organisational procedures used to protect property. Organisational procedures used to protect both paper-based and electronic information. The Data Protection Act 1998 and The Computer Misuse Act 1990. Security of people As the reception area is usually located at the entrance of an organisation, it plays a crucial role in the security of an organisation. The following security measures are taken by the receptionist. Checking staff ID badges or

security passes Monitoring CCTV Controlling the entry system All staff should be issued with an ID badge (which contains information such as their name, photograph, job title, department) when they start working in the organisation. This should be shown to the receptionist each time they wish to gain entry to the building. Staff should also keep their ID badges prominently displayed throughout the day. Areas within and out with the building can be observed and recorded. Anyone wishing to enter the building must first contact the receptionist who will check their identity before the door is opened. These records provide information on who has been in the organisation at specific times.

Appointments book Visitors book Staff in/out book Issuing These allow authorised visitors to be identified by staff. Visitors visitors badges should not be left unsupervised when in the organisation. Other security measures to protect staff Checking staff All staff should be issued with an ID badge (which ID badges or contains information such as their name, photograph, security passes job title, department) when they start working in the organisation. This should be shown to the receptionist each time they wish to gain entry to the building. Staff should also keep their ID badges prominently displayed throughout the day. Monitoring

Areas within and out with the building can be observed and CCTV recorded. Controlling the Anyone wishing to enter the building must first contact the entry system receptionist who will check their identity before the door is opened. Appointments These records provide information on who has been in the book organisation at specific times. Visitors book Staff in/out book Issuing These allow authorised visitors to be identified by staff. Visitors visitors should not be left unsupervised when in the organisation. badges Security of property

Attach equipment to desk Mark equipment with UV (ultra violet) pens Computer keyboards/monitors etc. could be bolted to desks. In event of property being stolen, police would be able to quickly find out the owner of the property. This may be used as a deterrent to thieves. Keep an inventory of equipment Keeping a record of equipment means that if any equipment goes missing it will quickly be noticed. This may act as a deterrent to thieves. Security cables These can be used with portable

laptops/notebooks/netbooks. A steel cable secures the item to any solid or fixed object. This must be done before leaving the premises, particularly by the last member of staff in the building. Ensure office doors and windows are locked Alarm Security guard Security blinds This may be set at night when the building is empty. The police may be contacted directly if the alarm is activated. A security guard may patrol the premises (usually at night) to protect the building. Security lighting could also be used at night to detect motion. Strong shutters can be placed over doors and windows to prevent burglary, theft and vandalism.

Security of information Information may be paper-based (manual) or electronic (on computer ). Securing information stored manually Access to areas of the building where confidential information is kept should be restricted - locked doors, or key pad/combination locks/swipe cards etc. Visitors should never be left unsupervised at any time. Filing cabinets should be locked and only authorised personnel should have access to the keys. Confidential information should never be left lying around) and it should

either be filed securely or shredded immediately after use. Security of information stored electronically Each individual computer user should be issued with a unique username and a password this makes it easier to monitor use of the computer system. Usernames and passwords will control access to: Computers the computer can only be used when the username/password is entered correctly. Files each username and password will give the user access to the information they require. (access rights or access level passwords.)

Passwords can also be used with a screensaver. Confidential information should never be left on the screen for others to see either a password-protected screensaver should be activated or shut-down procedures should be followed. Security of information stored electronically

Saving files as read-only documents so they cannot be changed by other users ensuring storage media (flash drives/pens, CDs, etc.) should be labelled and stored in a locked drawer inserting security ID cards/keys into the computer (these are only held by authorised users) using measures such as voiceprint/fingerprint recognition or iris/signature scanners installing anti-virus software to ensure that no computer virus can corrupt the data using encryption software to code the data if the computer is hacked then the data is meaningless to the hacker All data held on computer should be backed-up on a regular basis. This means taking a second copy of the data that is then stored separately. Data Protection Act 1998 The Data Protection Act is a LAW applies to

information stored both manually and electronically. It protects both the data subject and the data user Data users must be registered with the Data Protection Registrar and follow the principles of the Act. Data must be made available to the data subject upon request. If an organisation fails to comply with the Act it may be prosecuted and fined. Data Protection Act 1998 The Act states that personal data must be:

fairly and lawfully processed used for the registered purpose only adequate, relevant and not excessive accurate kept for no longer than is necessary kept securely processed in line with the individuals legal rights transferred to countries outside the European Economic area only if the individuals rights can be assured. Computer Misuse Act 1990 The purpose of the Computer Misuse Act 1990 is to prohibit unlawful access to computer

systems. This act makes it illegal to: access computers without permission (e.g. hacking) access computers with the intention of committing a criminal offence access computers to change or alter details without permission Organisations own security measures The size and nature of business conducted by an organisation will determine the security measures it will take.

An organisation will make use of a wide range of security measures in order to protect the people who work and visit the organisation, its property and the information stored in the organisation. Security - Summary Organisations view the security of people, property and information very seriously. They employ a range of measures to ensure that they are kept secure. Organisations should also ensure they comply with the Data Protection Act 1998 and The Computer Misuse Act 1990. To ensure people are kept secure Reception staff may: check staff ID badges monitor CCTV use intercoms/entryphones/buzzer systems keep an appointments book/visitors book/staff in and out book

issue visitors badges Security Got it? I understand organisational procedures used to protect people. I understand organisational procedures used to protect property. I understand organisational procedures used to protect both paper-based and electronic information. I understand The Data Protection Act 1998 and The Computer Misuse Act 1990. Organising and supporting events Organising and supporting events In this section you will learn: What an event is.

Tasks undertaken by an admin assistant when planning for the event. Tasks undertaken by an admin assistant during the event. Tasks undertaken by an admin assistant following the event. What is an event? meetings interviews award ceremonies fundraising event sales event press conference training sessions Event Administration Support

An admin assistant will be expected to support events planned by an organisation, this includes completing a range of tasks and producing various documents relating to an event. An admin assistant will usually break down the administration of an event into three areas: Planning tasks tasks that carried out before the event takes place. Supporting the event tasks that relate to the day of the event. Follow-up tasks tasks that are

completed after the event has taken place. Planning the event To ensure a successful event, planning is key! An event brief is usually received by the admin assistant to explain the purpose of the event/meeting Once this has been received the admin assistant can start to plan for the event.

To-do List A to-do list or a priorities list will make it easier for the admin assistant to focus on what needs to be done and when. The admin assistant will create a list of tasks to be undertaken for the event and will then sort these tasks into order of urgency (priority). They should refer to the priorities list on a regular basis to ensure nothing is missed out. One of the first items on the priorities list will be to select a suitable date. Consideration must be given to things that may affect the

number of people going to the event, such as public holidays or competing events. Once a date has been selected it should be entered into the (electronic) diaries of affected members of staff immediately (to avoid double bookings). Selecting a Venue for the Event The venue should then be chosen. The following should be considered when selecting a venue:

Is the date selected available? The number of people attending. Ease of access for all attendees. (Is it near a bus/train station? Is parking available?) Room layout. What IT and audio/visual facilities are available (laptops, data projectors, flip charts etc.) Is catering available? Will any special dietary requirements be catered for? Budget is the cost of the venue within the specified budget? Does the venue comply with health and safety legislation, such as are there toilet facilities available?

What next? A number of venues can be researched before finding the most suitable one; and once a venue has been selected it should be booked. This can be done using e-mail, fax, telephone or letter. The admin assistant should ensure that written confirmation of the booking is received, whether via e-mail, post or fax. Keeping within budget is very important. Some costs include: hiring the venue, hiring speakers, catering, stationery, marketing, transport, staff costs, equipment hire. Spreadsheet software should be used to keep a track of the costs of the event. Notice of Meeting/Agenda Invitations should be sent out to potential attendees, for example key/guest speakers. If the event is a regular occurrence, such as

an annual general meeting (AGM), a notice of meeting and an agenda should be prepared and sent to those who are eligible to attend. An agenda is a document that lists topics to be discussed at the meeting in the order in which the discussions will take place. Notice of Meeting/Agenda Notice of meeting A meeting of the Perth Curling Club will be held in the Conference Suite, Perth Grand Hotel on 21 May 2013 at 7.30 pm. Agenda 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

7. Apologies for absence. Minutes of previous meeting. Matters arising. Fundraising for new equipment. Scottish Curling Championship. Any other business. Date of next meeting. Public Event If the event is open to the public or is not a regular occurrence then promotional/advertising material must be prepared this may include adverts to be placed in local/national newspapers

or flyers to be placed in appropriate places that potential delegates may see. What else has to be done before the event? Once who will be attending the event has been established, depending on the event, a database with details of the attendees should be created. Production of name badges and place cards, as the mail merge facility can be used if needed.

Create a room plan. It is now possible to should create the room plan, considering where IT and audio/visual facilities are, where people should sit etc Prepare any presentations. Rehearse. IT. If attendees are to receive information at the event, the admin assistant should ensure that an attendee pack is prepared. Before the event To-do list To-do list/Priorities list of tasks to be completed before the event Completed 1. Check event brief for basic information. 2. Select suitable date and enter into (electronic) diaries. 3. Create a spreadsheet for event costs. 4. Research suitable venues. 5. Select and book venue.

6. Send invitation to guest speaker(s). 7. Send out notice of meeting and agenda or promotional materials for event. 8. Prepare presentation for guest speaker. 9. Create an attendee database. 10. Create name badges/place cards etc. 11. Create a room plan . 12. Attendee packs prepared. On the day The admin assistant should arrive at the venue early to ensure that everything required for the event to run smoothly is ready by the time attendees arrive.

The admin assistant should bring all relevant documentation to the event, such as: name badges place cards the room plan attendee packs the attendee database the presentation for the guest speaker Before the event takes place, all direction signs should be placed in relevant areas, the room should be set out according to the plan already created, place cards should be set out and the IT facilities checked. On the day An attendance desk should be set up to which attendees report

to register and receive their name badges and attendee packs. The attendee database could be used at this stage to record attendance. The admin assistant should also check with the management team of the centre that catering requirements have been arranged. During the event, the admin assistant should assist guest speakers and attendees with any questions/queries. If the event is a meeting the admin assistant will be required to take minutes of the meeting, a formal record of discussions that take place. After the event follow-up tasks Once the event has taken place the admin assistant should ensure that the venue has been tidied and any equipment that was

borrowed has been returned. It is important to evaluate the success of the event. Evaluation forms should be prepared and sent to attendees to gather their feedback on the event. Attendees are often asked to complete the evaluation form at the end of the event or they can be e-mailed it for completion at a later date. Evaluation form Training event Date of event: Venue: How satisfied were you with the following? (Please circle as appropriate.) Very satisfied Dissatisfied

5 4 3 2 The information distributed before the event. 5 4 3 2 The organisation of the day. 5 4 3 2 The venue and facilities. The arrangements and quality of the 5 4 3 2

catering. The presentations that were delivered at the 5 4 3 2 venue. 5 4 3 2 The time-keeping at the event. 5 4 3 2 The helpfulness of staff at this event. Please indicate below what you think could have improved this event. 1

1 1 1 1 1 1 Event Follow-up Review evaluation forms and take feedback into consideration when planning the next event. Management are often interested in how the event was perceived and may ask the admin assistant to prepare a brief report on the event and the feedback given by attendees.

If the event was a meeting the admin assistant should prepare the Minutes of meeting asap Often action minutes are also prepared. Event follow-up Thank you letters should be sent to the venue, key helpers and to guest speakers. Attendee database should be checked to ensure it has been updated with the actual people who were present at the event.

The spreadsheet should be updated with actual costs of the event. A comparison of actual cost with budgeted costs (expected) is useful in order to find out if there were any areas of over- or under-spending. This will help with future event planning. An organisation will want to share news of its successful event by placing information about it on their website, on social media, or perhaps in a newsletter. Events Got it? I can explain what an event is. I can describe the tasks undertaken by an

admin assistant when planning for the event. I can describe the tasks undertaken by an admin assistant on the day of the event. I can describe the tasks undertaken by an admin assistant following the event. Administrative Practices Unit Assessment National 4 Administrative practices Outcome 1 Provide an overview of administration in the workplace by: 1. Naming the main tasks, skills and

qualities of an administrative assistant. 2. Outlining the key features of good customer care. 3. Outlining the key employee responsibilities in terms of health and safety. 4. Outlining the key employee responsibilities in terms of the security of people, property and information. Outcome 2 Carry out administrative tasks in the context of organising and supporting small-scale events, according to a simple brief by: 1. Carrying out straightforward planning tasks for the event. 2. Edit documents to support the event. 3. Carrying out follow-up activities.

National 5 Provide an account of administration in the workplace by: 1. Describing the tasks, skills and qualities of an administrative assistant. 2. Describing key features of good customer care in the context of administration. 3. Describing the organisational responsibilities in terms of health and safety. 4. Describing the key organisational responsibilities in terms of the security of people, property and information. Interpret a given brief and carry out administrative tasks in the context of organising and supporting events by: 1. Carrying out planning tasks, taking account of the budget available. 2. Preparing documents to support the event.

3. Carrying out follow-up activities.

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